Jump to content

Patch Trading Central

Have a patch or memorabilia you're looking to swap? Use this virtual patch trading blanket. (This area is intended to facilitate memorabilia swapping, not necessarily commerce.)

367 topics in this forum

    • 4 replies
    • 1934 views
    • 0 replies
    • 215 views
    • 5 replies
    • 357 views
    • 8 replies
    • 669 views
    • 5 replies
    • 300 views
    • 3 replies
    • 285 views
    • 4 replies
    • 380 views
    • 10 replies
    • 581 views
    • 9 replies
    • 795 views
    • 9 replies
    • 2822 views
    • 56 replies
    • 6231 views
    • 0 replies
    • 307 views
    • 0 replies
    • 331 views
    • 2 replies
    • 412 views
    • 2 replies
    • 714 views
  • LATEST POSTS

    • I would argue that the younger teen and pre-teen girls don't really understand how people react to what they are wearing -- they are just wanting to look "in", and probably care a lot more about what their female friends think that about what boys think.    What I don't understand is the parents who don't advise/enforce appropriate clothing for their girls.   These kids are not driving themselves to the store to buy their clothing with money they earned themselves.  
    • Actually, they had tried modernizing, repeatedly, especially starting in the early 1970's and continuing into the 1980's.   Those uniforms were terrible. I really did not appreciate being mistaken for a flight attendant when in uniform. 
    • But what scale is appropriate at what age?   I still like the old version of the Brownie Promise "I promise to do my best to love God and my country, to help other people every day, especialy those at home."   This was for up to age 9, and helping at home was something that girls could really do. In the newer program, the Junior Journey "Agent of Change" (for girls starting at age 9)  is encouraging civic action.   An example that is held up as a model is persuading other people to volunteer at an animal shelter.   I'd rather the younger scouts get in the habit of actualy helping people, not just badgering other people to help.
    • Nine.  The first nine points of the BSA law summarizes these nine (at least if you think that "Kind" summarized "A Friend to Animals".  
    • I think they kind of cluster together, but this is just me. Like @SSScout said, they are tuned to the American ear of a century ago.  Trustworthy, Loyal, and Helpful are for citizenship Friendly, Courteous, and Kind are interpersonal Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty speak to being mentally awake Brave, Clean, and Reverent speak to physical strength and moral rectitud. I don't know if there is any intent in the order, but it seems that I do see them appear in boys on a deeper-than-surface level in roughly that sequence.  
  • Who's Online (See full list)

×