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Questions and answers for parents and leaders new to Scouting.

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  1. crafts and games?

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  2. Cook kits

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  3. Unorganized Packs and Dens

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  4. Arizona Scouts

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  5. Two Deep Leadership

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • As the OP weaves its way along it might be good to review the first FAQ on why BSA has an Annual Health and Medical Record some but not all that have been batted back and forth.     Q. Why does the BSA require all participants to have an Annual Health and Medical Record? 
      A. The AMHR serves many purposes. Completing a health history promotes health awareness, collects necessary data, and provides medical professionals critical information needed to treat a patient in the event of an illness or injury. It also provides emergency contact information. Poor health and/or lack of awareness of risk factors have led to disabling injuries, illnesses, and even fatalities. Because we care about our participants’ health and safety, the Boy Scouts of America has produced and required use of standardized annual health and medical information since at least the 1930s. The medical record is used to prepare for high-adventure activities and increased physical activity. In some cases, it is used to review participants’ readiness for gatherings like the national Scout jamboree and other specialized activities. Because many states regulate the camping industry, the Annual Health and Medical Record also serves as a tool that enables councils to operate day and resident camps and adhere to BSA and state requirements. The Boys Scouts of America’s Annual Health and Medical Record provides a standardized mechanism that can be used by members in all 50 states. RichardB
    • Oh come on, it's too early in the day for blindsiding people with that kind wit.  I now need to clean the coffee out of my keyboard. We've been on EPIC, I think pretty much from the start - probably 15?  17 years now?  And our physicians still need to keep backup paper copies of their charting records because EPIC so reliably loses or corrupts them.  My PCP, as well as a couple specialists, have been re-entering the same data about a cardiac event I suffered, at every visit for going on 4 years now, and the fact that I have a stent still comes as a surprise to every new clinician I interact with, because EPIC just keeps losing the data. Don't trust EMRs to provide accurate information.  Not now, and probably not any time in our lifetimes.  The bureaucratic purpose for EPIC is as a billing system, not as a system to enable clinicians to provide care.  Unless you believe that some day bureaucrats are going to prioritize something other than their own interests, I wouldn't hold out much hope that it's going to improve. Will 
    • @EastCst, welcome to the forums! I don't have much to add, except this ... Son #1's cubmaster (of about 10 years ago) was laid to rest yesterday. He was a stand-up guy. But there were moments of contention. I thought, "What was so important that everyone had to dig their heels in?" Time is short. For some, way shorter than anyone thinks. Remind everyone of that. Move on.
    • dug deep pulling up a 9 year old post   and no one said anything about excluding a due paying Scout or Scouter from events.  The original post asked about an unregistered Mom and underage sibling
    • Yeah, scouting becomes such a different environment that there's no way of telling how this will tilt. A scout like this who has come up to me with issue X (that has nothing to do with safety) will usually get a response like, "Good news: nobody cares." I try to be as polite as possible and support the chain of command. Generally there's plenty of work to do. So, in the process, things like this find their own norm if you let it. You will probably have to convey to such a scout that you hold your PL's in highest esteem. But, as time goes on, focus on how he/she performs in the troop and encourage the rest of the scouts to do so. Eventually you all might just be able to discuss if a change in manner in the rest of life is in order.
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