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Questions and answers for parents and leaders new to Scouting.

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • I don't buy that argument. The high adventure bases already have  pocket patches for NAYLE attendees, so what on earth would be the least little bit hard about having a small shoulder emblem too. They don't even have to sell it via the national scout shop....they could just stock it at the sites that offer NAYLE training. The pocket patch isn't really as useful as the shoulder emblem because it's then a "temporary" patch, vying for space with summer camp patches, high adventure base patches, and lots of award emblems like Nova awards, National Outdoor award patches, etc. Besides, a pocket patch for NAYLE is inconsistent with the way training is indicated for ILST and NYLT.  Consistency is good and increases the visibility of leadership progression. Still looking for a GOOD reason for not having a NAYLE emblem....
    • Not enough demand for it. I remember reading that there has to be X number of people eligible for it for them to produce it, excepting high level recognition like Silver Antelope. I am assuming there is a cool NAYLE temp patch. The previous course did. 
    • Scouts typically wear a "Trained" emblem on their shoulder if they completed ILST.... ...or a "NYLT" emblem if they completed more advanced leadership training.... ...but why isn't there a similar "NAYLE" emblem for the scouts who complete BSA's highest level youth leadership training?
    • Well, I'm with you, this isn't the subject thread to debate. All I'll say is my experience is the opposite of your bullet points. Sadly, your bullets suggest scouts don't mature past juvenile self-servingness. As for giving up on teaching, well I guess, but again you are defining the two different mentalities for mixed age and same age patrols. Mixed age relies on the role modeling to foster growth. Same age relies on outside instruction support for growth. Mixed age from its conception was intended for self-contained independent patrols. Same age patrols require an outside support structure. They are giving up on teaching because their experiment failed. Patrol method is designed for independent growth and teaching doesn't allow that kind of independence.  The fears behind  your bullets say you don't trust (or even believe) role modeling has power for developing character. I have worked and counseled many adult leaders with the same thoughts about role modeling. The same age patrol approach to youth development simply doesn't lend itself to the original design of Patrol Method, and your frustration is reflected in your original post asking "What is the guiding reason for having patrols?". Watching those adults, you either have to change your expectations of scout growth, or just take what you get and know it's the best you can do. Barry
    • So - The United States Flag Code, Title 4, Section 8k states-“The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem of display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.” Pretty much that is about the only instruction.  There are many ways to do this is a dignified manner, and that interpretation (dignified manner) would be up to the unit and those performing the retirement
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