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    • Roughly the same, but no fragrances/fresheners. I will leave them out a couple of days if the weather is nice. I will put my tech fabrics in a washer. Dry on low. My son's down bag: the tub, then dry on high briefly. I throw in a tennis ball to fluff it. My synthetic fleece blankets seem to go through the wash cycle well. Wool requires a little more care, but they don't smell-up as quickly either. That's probably because I don't pull them out unless I'm bracing for bitter cold.
    • There are other things that can be "overnighters" but that I don't consider to be camping. My son's pack did some "overnighters" like a night in the Zoo, or a sleep aboard on the USS Lexington.  These are fun things for the boys to do, but they're not in the woods, don't involve setting up tents, don't involve cooking their meals, and similar things that really define "camping". Just saying...
    • I try not to wash my sleeping bag very often because it's kind of a pain, and it always seems to feel a bit lumpy afterwards.  Still, there are plenty of times where a good wash and dry is the only thing to do, short of buying a new one. GENERALLY...
      After each campout, I open it up, spray it with Febreze and hang it over the rail of my deck to air out. WHEN IT GETS TO SMELLY/WET/SWEATY/DIRTY...
      I hand-wash it in a tub using laundry soap, then I lay it out on the deck to dry. Usually, I wash it in the morning and leave it out all day in the sun. I NEVER...
      Wash it in a washing machine and I never dry it in a clothes dryer. 
      I don't take it to a cleaners. What do you do to keep the sleeping bag clean and fresh and lasting as long as possible?
    • You're right, it's a donation to support Scouting. We're fine with that; we know it, and our customers know it.  Nobody is "lying", if they want cheap popcorn, they know it can be bought inside the supermarket we're selling in front of.  Yet for some reason, his Pack still sells thousands of dollars outside supermarkets. My son isn't trying to run a business. We're out funding our adventure in the most efficient manner possible, so we can get back to doing Scout stuff.  
    • The results of the Troop coffee fundraiser are in, and we netted $7,600 to surpass our goal of $4,000.  We probably have another $500 to come in from some stragglers.  On top of this we received $6,000 from some institutional sources, so we have what we need to greatly subsidize the costs of our under-resourced families and their girls in our 30-Scout Troop.  We will use some for some equipment purchases and make a Friends of Scouting contribution to our local council (something like $1,500).  The rest we will save to begin building our long-term fund for stability.  Thanks to everyone for the many good suggestions.  We used every one of them. Note to Liz:  There is no girl-specific Web Site template out there at this point.  We wrote ours from scratch after we figured out how we would operate.  Then we did our best to determine what an 11-13 year old girl and her parents would want to know about that implementation and wrote to that specific interest in our very-urban environment.  We talk directly to that girl except for my “Scoutmaster’s Letter” to the parents — but even that is very specific to our urban all-girl implementation.  I will say the writing of the site turned out to be the way we ended up understanding our challenges and deciding how the Troop would launch and operate.  The site has been a huge hit.  Our new parents love it because it is beginner-friendly and explains the basics without using any Scouting lingo or abbreviations.  While not relevant to our use of our site, it is interesting to note that it has been viewed by 2.2K discrete visitors since going active on October 1, 2018, including viewers from 40 countries.  Maybe this is just a typical result for troop web sites — I just don’t know.
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