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Order of the Arrow

Discussions for OA Members and those interested in Scouting's Honor Society. Also includes a private sub-forum for OA Members only.


Subforums

  1. Western Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    35
    posts
  2. NOAC

    Been to NOAC? Heading there? Chat about the Order's bi-annual gathering

    156
    posts
  3. Central Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    136
    posts
  4. Northeast Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    50
    posts
  5. Southern Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussion

    154
    posts

563 topics in this forum

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  1. The Long House

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    • 414 views
    • 2 replies
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  2. OA Conclave

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    • 413 views
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  3. I need some help

    • 1 reply
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    • 3 replies
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    • 1 reply
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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Hmmm ...  I trust you are refering to something like this ...  See FS-601 Food Standards        https://www.scouting.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2019-National-NCAP-Standards.pdf It's obviously a good idea.  It's a good tool also to use for self reflection on your menus. BUT, does it explicitly apply as a strict rule to a OA conclave?  When I read page 6 of the above link, I read think of camps that are run by paid staff and are marketed and advertised as such.  I think of $1200 Sea Base, $1200 Philmont, $300+ council week long summer camps, $100+ webelos summer camps, council day camps, etc.  I think of something that is to reflect paid professional programming and paid food service that happens with business like execution.  I think of auditors that assess if the paid staff meet the standard.  Then, the program gets a pendant to hang in the dining hall for that year. OA conclaves (and fall district camporees) are NOT BSA accredited.   OA conclaves are volunteer led / coordinated and more closely resemble a troop than a paid program.  Instead of a troop, you have a lodge.  Instead of a SPL, you have a lodge chief.  Instead of a SM, you have a lodge advisor.  Likewise, cost resembles volunteer organization with cost covering food and camp-site fees.  Costs don't reflect a paid program. Page 6 extract is below.   PURPOSE OF THE STANDARDS The BSA national camp standards are established to: 1. Ensure the health, safety, and well-being of every camper, leader, visitor, and staff member while participating in a BSA-accredited camp. 2. Ensure that each camper and leader obtains a quality program consistent with the BSA brand. The local council is responsible for maintaining the BSA national camp standards. The national camp standards are the foundation of the National Camp Accreditation Program, which assesses council and camp conformance with the requirements of the national camp standards. THE NATIONAL CAMP ACCREDITATION PROGRAM The purpose of the BSA’s National Camp Accreditation Program (NCAP) is to help councils elevate camps to new levels of excellence in delivering Scouting’s promise to youth
    • The only reason I suggest a camps with regular volunteer led activities open to both scout patrols and lone scouts (aka family scouting) is that times have changes.  Many parents won't back away from their kids and recognize kids need to solve their own issues.  So the question then becomes, is there a way we can show value to those scouts where the parents won't back away from their kids?   Maybe the camp master could setup a time where the camp master would be willing to observe and sign-off on seeing a youth setup a tent and understand what is needed.  Maybe, another youth could cook dinner using dutch ovens and a skilled volunteer effectively could sign off on some of the skill requirements.   My preference is patrol based and continually mentoring the adults to back off.  But the outdoors is key and even without the patrol, youth can learn skills, self-reliance and that they can deal with and survive hardships more than they'd ever believe.   BP created something great, but times change and programs evolve.
    • As scouts should have boating, shooting sports, hikes, etc... camps should promote a long list of prefered adult activities ... read a book, take a nap, clean your car, perform a camp service project like paint a building, etc.  Effectively all activities that keep them far more than arms length away from the scouts.
    • You should lock all these threads.  The bankruptcy is just bringing out the worst in everyone and just breading anger.  Block all commentaries and only allow posting ofew newspaper articles.  Heck, even then I'm sure both sides can find supportive newspaper articles.  
    • I finished Short-term camp administration training a few weeks ago and have applied the training for an OA fellowship/fundraiser. 94 -ish pages of standards. Not a big job for our event as it was at a church in town.  Recently during a planning meeting for Conclave we were reminded that a certified Dietician was required to approve menu items for the event. And that the event had to be within so many minutes of a hospital, which is problematic with many camps being distant from city centers. Has anyone else had any challenges meeting one of the new standards while planning OA events?
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