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Order of the Arrow

Discussions for OA Members and those interested in Scouting's Honor Society. Also includes a private sub-forum for OA Members only.

Subforums

  1. Western Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    33
    posts
  2. NOAC

    Been to NOAC? Heading there? Chat about the Order's bi-annual gathering

    151
    posts
  3. Central Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    136
    posts
  4. Northeast Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    50
    posts
  5. Southern Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussion

    141
    posts

545 topics in this forum

  1. Lodge event patches

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  2. SummitCorps

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  3. OA "Password"

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    • 12 replies
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  4. OA Question

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    • 9 replies
    • 540 views
  5. Naguonabe Patch site

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • The most non traditional project I've seen was one of our scout's organizing a dinner in our parish that showed the distribution of hunger in the world.  A very small number of people got a typical first world dinner: meat, rice, vegetables, dessert;  a slightly larger number received rice with a little bit of chicken; and everyone else received a cup of plain rice.  Along with the dinner he had presentations from groups that fight hunger, both locally and more broadly, with specific sign up opportunities to volunteer for them.  He then tracked the participation rates of those who volunteered that evening. There was some push back on it initially, he had the leadership part covered by organizing his fellow scouts to cook dinner for over a hundred people.  The lasting impact part took some explaining but it was fulfilled by both the educational aspect and the specific volunteer work generated by the event. Beat the heck out of another park bench as far as i was concerned. 
    • I am reminded of this Girl Scout Gold project .. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/inspired-life/wp/2018/06/22/a-girl-scout-wrote-to-companies-with-a-heartfelt-request-as-a-result-they-cut-down-on-millions-of-plastic-straws/?noredirect=on
    • While the premise is laudable the danger of it becoming a political punching bag would have been considerable.  On the other hand, taking the campaign to another level, and incorporating other youth is a focused and well-planned campaign might fit.  As it is presented in the vague story, it would be hard-pressed to meet the project parameters.  Still, we do need to encourage our current generation to take control and work towards a better world environment.  
    • Point well made. I wasn't initially a fan of this Eagle project as there is clearly a political motivation here.  The minute a Scout gets involved in a process that provides benefit to some and results in expense to others where the choice is made by a political body, the project is by nature political.  While this cause seems pretty noble - so to are many others which can be seen as more controversial.  Scouting has been through enough turmoil lately that we don't need even more political affiliation. Yet, I agree think Eagle projects could have even more relevance in the community if Scouts were encouraged to raise the bar like this.  So, for that matter, I think this is a good example of innovation in an Eagle project.
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