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Order of the Arrow

Discussions for OA Members and those interested in Scouting's Honor Society. Also includes a private sub-forum for OA Members only.

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  1. Western Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

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  2. NOAC

    Been to NOAC? Heading there? Chat about the Order's bi-annual gathering

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  3. Central Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

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  4. Northeast Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

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  5. Southern Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussion

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • No, two different issues and policies are being conflated here.   The rules that allow for work done in a foreign scouting organization to be considered existed before the creation of the Temporary Transition Rules and are found in the GTA (https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/33088.pdf), 5.0.4.0, page 38. The Temporary Transition rules (https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/02/Implementation-Details-for-Scouts-BSA.pdf) apply to the extension allowed to scouts that join now who are over 16 but under 18.   To summarize the two different issues: 1. Can a US citizen, who was likely domiciled in the US at the time, complete work in a foreign scouting organization and then have the work considered and credited after they join BSA. To answer that question, we turn to the GTA - but it does not answer it directly. It is my contention that this was simply an oversight and that such a situation just was not considered previously due to just how rare it would be. If it was considered, then I think it would be fair to assume that the GTA would explicitly state such - just like it explicitly states that Eagle may not be awarded via this method. I base my opinion on the idea that it would serve none of the AIMS of scouting to allow a foreign citizen to gain consideration for credit, including Merit Badges, up to but no including Eagle, for the work they did but deny that same credit for the same work to a US citizen. It seems strange to me that we would have a policy biased against US citizens based on their domicile. [Edit: And it would appear that her Council agreed with such and credited her for prior work completed.] 2. Should scouts that have prior work credited be allowed to obtain Eagle prior to the established deadline in the Temporary Transition Rules (TTR). As the document states, it takes roughly 20 months to complete the work to obtain Eagle. Absent any prior work being recognized, no new scout should be able to get it any quicker, male or female. The TTR specifically states that the first class of female Eagles will be recognized in the Fall of 2020. It creates no such restriction on males that join BSA in 2019. In general, I fully support the transition rules. In general, I don't support the idea that even if a council recognizes and credits work done in a foreign scouting organization, that one could obtain Eagle in just six months. But, if a council recognizes work performed in a foreign scouting organization for a male that joined BSA in 2019 for the first time, there is no restriction in the TTR on that individual obtaining Eagle this year. As such, the TTR does have the potential for disparate impact with this rule. From where I am sitting, my recommendation would be to quit the fight for early Eagle on her part - but I am in no way going to fault her or think less of her for her attempt to do what she thinks is right or fair. I am not in her shoes, I can't possible empathize with her plight, and it would be extremely judgmental for me (or anyone else), to think less of her for doing so.  
    • If memory serves, 2010 was on a military installation. We were their guests.
    • The joint task force was all military not civilian.      No one on that TF was my boss.   Sorry for your confusion.   
    • Oh, Please! Don't you guys ever get tired of sucking up to your bosses. 
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