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  • LATEST POSTS

    • I think there's a bunch of steps that can happen here before you start calling district and council folks.   As has already been shared - talk with the Scoutmaster.  There's about a 95% chance that's all it will take.  The conversation is simply one of "my son's going to have a hard time advancing if he has to write out these worksheets."  Just about every Scoutmaster I know would say "well, then let's find another way". If the Scoutmaster doesn't work out, then you call the Committee Chair.  The Scoutmaster serves as the discretion of the Committee.  The chair of the Committee has a lot of sway as a result. If that doesn't work, then you call the Chartered Organization Rep.  You explain how their Scout program is making it hard on your special needs son to advance. At that point, if I couldn't find a way to make it work, I'd do one of two things.
      1) act as transcriber and write out the forms.
      2) call the troop down the street and ask when their meeting is.  If after all that, you couldn't get it sorted out, then I wonder what kind of troop this really is.  
    • I thought it was going to be a neckerchief. 
    • If he does not make accommodations, you may have to involve your district and/or council special needs advisor(s) or advancement committee. This should be a last option and I would keep trying to talk to the SM. On a side note, I understand how some adults can not realize that a child with a disability is not like the rest of the population. I’m in a vocational high school for the medical field and we recently visited a hospital / long time care that only take cares of special needs children (mostly with cerebral palsy). I learned how they are completely different and even interpret their environment in a different way. I wish you the best of luck.  I would say the only thing you can do before involving your council/district (if the SM keeps saying no), is to educate him on disabilities.
    • My understanding is that the WOSM is like the United Nations.  National Scouting organizations can be members and work collectively together, but they don't grant the license for a Scouting association.  
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