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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Yes Yes - Learning for Life Scouts.  A program with great intentions and really can fit a need.  That being said, it is rife with potential for abuse and membership shenanigans.  These Scouts are 14% of the membership total for BSA (2016 numbers).  The councils and nationals solicit monies for their membership, so in many cases no real cost to the participants.  They may not even know they are involved in Scouts.  Actually in some cases they did not know because the groups never met and were paper only units.
    • Maybe....but I have serious doubts.  Safe bet our COR has never had interaction except when we track him down to sign something...   No argument there....just like the CM or SM should never do the CC or committee member stuff....etc... but that aint likely to ever be reality either....
    • I agree about venturing.... although I honestly have always felt like it's an afterthought spin-off and there's no way around it.... Just fundamentally seems to me that what venturing does really should be what a troop does already. Anyway, i often figured that "venturing" high adventure and flexibility would go a long way into holding interest more than the classroom that regular scouts has evolved into..... except it really seems to me that venturing just "works" better in some places rather than others..... in my brain, folks near mountains have more high adventure options.... here in the North Florida flatlands we have some good stuff but more limiting I think....scuba (although for really good diving you still have to travel a long way) , sailing, flat water paddling, and mountain biking.  Things like backpacking around here is mostly on trails that aren't so redeeming and the season is limited....folks near mountains and more northern places can do all of those things + rock climbing, tons of winter sports options, white water paddling, and all sorts of great backpacking and camping options summer and winter
    •   With all due respect to Qwazse, it is the understatement of the past 2 decades. Venturing had so much potential when I first heard about it in May 1998, that A) I was jealous that Exploring was not like it reagarding the recognitions and challenges to get them when I was of age and B) could not wait to promote it. Sadly my council focused o Cubs and "in school Scouting" units.
    • Depends on the hiker's medical history and preferences, the selected monitoring system and its response protocol. It could be a alarm to the hiker and to a monitoring station with a callback similar to a home security system and likely notification of other networked hiking members near you.  Or it could be self-monitoring with an alarm call list. Or something else. I agree the tech is remarkable. There are even non-invasive diabetes sensors now. I am skeptical of the sensors being in clothing or boots, I think arm/ankle bands would be more workable.  
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