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  1. Scouts with Disabilities

    Where parents and scouters go to discuss unique aspects to working with kids with special challenges.

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    A place to chat about Scouting's biggest gathering

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  1. Music for Eagle Ceremony

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  3. Position Codes

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • I'll add a few that I think are key Weight when empty - Gear only adds more weight.  Our trailer is 6x12 or 7x12 and must be 1500+ pounds empty.  So even empty, vehicles are affected by the trailer.  On one camp out, we rented a low profile UHaul aluminum trailer.  We had that thing packed tight and you could still not feel it behind the car.   Wind drag - How high and what shape is the trailer?  Some trailers will pull easier than  others just because of shape and height. Steel or aluminum - This directly goes to weight but also affects cost.  But, a light weight trailer will save the volunteers money replacing their transmissions.  Seriously.  I've been in multiple troops due to having too many sons.  For one troop, I regularly pulled their trailer.  In the other troop, I refused to pull the trailer as it was a beast filled to the brim with cast iron and heavy chuck boxes and stuff.   I would easily advocate for a troop to spend a few extra thousand to get a good light weight trailer.  It's a matter of being kind and considerate to your current and future volunteers.  
    • I completely agree with you.  I have two young men that earned their Eagle Badges and one aged out in December and the other in January and a third that will age out in June.  The two Eagles no longer attend meetings and have no interest in Scouts due to not being able to serve in a meaningful position.  Both served me well teaching Scouts and were respected by the Scouts and I am losing a great wealth of knowledge due to this new policy.  Funny how they are mature enough to serve in the military but not to be an ASM with BSA.  Sad times.  Sadly, I do not see BSA Membership increasing.  I don't think the girls will outpace the losses of the boys.  I know in my District alone, we are still at a loss in numbers.  Come December, we will lose 17 LDS troops alone.  I don't think we will ever recover from that.
    • Depends on the youth. For a very long time being in scouting wasn't cool. Adults can't change that, in fact if they try they'll just make it worse. If there are social media influencing youth that take a positive, pro scouting attitude to their 250,000- 1M followers....if older youth that younger kids respect are visibly enjoying scouting...if youth start live streaming their scouting adventures.... The potential for a unifying cultural experience is there, and there's not much left that everyone can do and talk about together. Prediction. When LDS leaves those numbers will be the floor for male membership. Three years out I wouldn't be surprised if a third of all Scouts, BSA members were female. Cub scouts is trickier because the GSUSA at that level is popular, but if there were 1.2 M cub scouts in 2017 and Oct 2018 numbers of 40,000 girls in cub scouts...I would bet 200,000 female cub scouts. 
    • I would have at their age too. I only stepped into ASM because I was needed and had experience to offer. There's much better things to do at 18-20 than to be an duplicate, unnecessary chaperone. 
    • I know of boys young men who no longer have an interest in serving Scouting who are in the 18-20 year old range because the BSA no longer trusts them due to their age. We spent years mentoring and advising them. They have more knowledge, skills, abilities, and EXPERIENCE than some of the new Scouters coming aboard, but they cannot be utilized. Heck, they can no longer be MBCs except at a summer camp or merit badge college. All because of their age an the new YP rules.  
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