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  • LATEST POSTS

    • The problems of English not disinguishing between you-singular and you-plural.   Do you read this as "if you (a hard worker) choose a spouse who is also a hard worker (and not just pretty/handsome) then you two together may camp more and work double-shifts less?   Or do you read this as "you will be able to goof off while your wife works"? The problems of internet comumication where we cannot see our listeners' mis-understanding in their eyes,  and correct it before it really takes root. Maybe I've been paying too much attention to what Quazse has been saying about girl venturers (it is generally complimentary) and the positives for girls in Scouts BSA,  so I did not read this into his words.      And has he himself indicated (see next quote) that was not what he was advocating. But I do agree that poor treatment of women in certain eras and certain locations has been a problem.   So,   if we adults are having occasional difficulties with understanding each other within the limits of the Internet,   what about kids these days? I find it disturbing that many elementary schoolers in my area have, for the last few years, had their own smart-phones (sometimes as hand-me-downs from parents).   What were their parents thinking?  Kids that age are not yet mature enough not to blurt out comments without thinking.   At least in person they can see if they are offending their friends, and clarify or appologize right away.   But on electronic media foolish impulsive remarks,  or even simply less-than-100% crystal clear remarks,  can linger long and can provoke negative overreactions on the parts of others.
    • That's OK.  No one can force my family's medical decisions (and I have not shared what they are, other than me not getting a flu shot).
    • Talk to your council and camp directors about the issue. They are the ones who will set and enforce any policies on the matter. 
    • Might suggest review of this:   https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/HealthSafety/pdf/680-103(18)_Prev_of_CommunicableDiseases.pdf  
    • The purpose of the original post was to see if camps had policies in place for future outbreaks.  The absence of outbreaks in the past is irrelevant when vaccination rates are declining to the point where "herd immunity" is decaying.  For measles, herd immunity requires a vaccination rate of 90-95% and many areas are already well below that (see map).  A single nurse isn't going to be able to handle a situation where 10% or more of the children in a large camp are infected.  Furthermore, measles patients are contagious four days before symptoms appear.  BSA has a religious component, so presumably it will respect non-vaccination choices for religious reasons, whether they are ostensible or not.  So, should camps have at least written policies in place indicating what will happen if (or when) an outbreak occurs? Map source: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/a-quiet-rise-in-unvaccinated-children-could-put-the-u-s-at-risk-of-outbreaks
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