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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Our troop coordinates the district in placing flags at a large cemetery. Looks like we'll be working around some storms tonight.
    • The basics of all these skills are taught to new adult leaders in the IOLS (Introduction to Outdoor Leadership Skills) course.  This is required for Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters in order to be considered "trained" for their position. Scoutmasters and the more dedicated/hardcore ASMs tend to pursue additional training as they grow into their roles. That might include Wood Badge, or it might take the form of specific skills that enable them to lead or do more within scouting (like taking Wilderness First Aid courses so that they can lead crews at high adventure bases). Parents of new scouts generally do not know much about camping, and few could tie knots, demonstrate map and compass skills, or do the basic first aid tasks that a young scout is asked to demonstrate.  But parents can learn and have fun doing it.  Like my dad used to say, "You can always teach an old dog a new trick."
    • Sounds like you'd create a more relevant, challenging program. In addition to incorporating more Orienteering and Wilderness Survival skills, I'd include the "challenging" requirements from Pioneering MB.  Using lashings to make something really COOL would be challinging and a practical demonstration of using kntos and lashings.  (Besides, who doesn't want to try out a monkey bridge??) I also think that skills in handling watercraft are useful and relevant.  Maybe sailing, or maybe kayaking or canoeing.   Basic river rescue skills could also be useful.   Swimming skills at the level that they could save a life would be nice:  complete BSA Lifeguard, or complete BSA Aquatics Supervision: Swimming and Water Rescue (or similarly challenging course, such as Red Cross or YMCA lifeguard certifications). I think it would also be useful to challenge scouts to master some subset of skills to the level they can teach it, for example, get a Red Cross CPR instructor certificate, or become a Leave No Trace trainer, or complete the USA Archery instructor course.  (Not just go through the motions using EDGE, but actually be able to teach a skill "for real").
    • This was back in 2000.  Has probably changed since then.
    • Insoles help me. I wear Sole Reds now. I previously wore Superfeet Green which are popular.  I had to experiment which gets expensive though less than a $400 custom orthopedic insert. This link will give you an idea of different brands. I have not bought from this online store. I buy Soles from local shoe store and Superfeet from REI.   https://www.theinsolestore.com/backpacking-hiking-boot-insoles.html?foot_conditions=396
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