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  • LATEST POSTS

    • The Simplifying Outdoor Access for Recreation (SOAR) Act, in part, would allow agencies to issue a single permit for trips that cross agency boundaries—USDA Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service—a process that is currently time-consuming and entangled in red tape. Every year, Americans spend more on outdoor recreation than they do on pharmaceuticals and fuel, combined, the Outdoor Industry Association (OIA) reports. The outdoor recreation economy generates $887 billion in annual consumer spending, 7.6 million jobs, $65.3 billion in federal tax revenue, and $59.2 billion in state and local tax revenue—and it’s still growing. Recreation is a huge part of this country, but for a lot of people, there are still barriers to participate. Often, they turn to backcountry guides as their sole way of recreating. So why is it so hard for guides and their groups to access public lands?  Senators—Martin Heinrich (D-NM) and Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) introduced the bill. Source: https://www.snewsnet.com/adventure-travel/senate-introduces-simplifying-outdoor-access-for-recreation-act
    • I am no expert but I would think it would be entirely appropriate especially if the content is taken directly from the BSA guidelines.  If you're thinking about making your own rules, then your COR and your committee would probably need to approve the ideas first. But if you're talking about a "quick summary" of BSA guidelines for uniforms and smoking rules and other adult behavior guidelines, I don't see how that could be inappropriate. 
    • Would it be inappropriate of me to developing a Leader guide that sets expectations and guidelines for our Unit Leaders?   No smoking or any facsimile thereof around Scouts, uniform expectations for leaders, etc...  Everyone knows straight up what is expected of them?
    • The thing that's missing here is a description of the program. We have aims and methods but no description of how the methods lead to the aims. It almost sounds like it's multiple choice.  It seems to me that @Eagledad is saying the program has a large component in which older scouts teach, work with, and lead the younger scouts to eventually take the place of the older scouts. Although I like this it isn't explicitly explained anywhere. @fred8033 seems to be saying it's less about that and more about adventure. Of course, that isn't described anywhere either. Maybe I'm putting words in people's mouths but my only point is there's no guidance as to what the program is. This is causing confusion. For a contrast, and I've mentioned this before, I met some Israeli scouts and their program is almost entirely about the older scouts guiding the younger scouts. A scout troop goes from Kindergarten to 21-ish. There are no den leaders and very few adults (2-3 in a troop of 100). The older scouts are responsible for everyone and everything. We talked about ranks and they just didn't see how ranks could help them with their responsibilities. Eagle was just an odd idea to them. If you're going to be an older scout then you will be running a troop. From the day you join as a 6 year old you know what you'll be responsible for as you get older. Whether you like this model or not, there's no question what the program is. Everyone knows what it is. I'd rather see more outdoors but their sense of camaraderie, teamwork, and community is impressive. The scouts I met, while admittedly a select group, were above and beyond what I've seen in any similar group in the BSA. Leadership, confidence, responsibility. They were an impressive group. They also have over 90% of eligible youth in their scouting program.  
    • You need a common goal...or enemy.
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