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  1. Scouts with Disabilities

    Where parents and scouters go to discuss unique aspects to working with kids with special challenges.

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  2. Going to the next Jamboree?

    A place to chat about Scouting's biggest gathering

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Wolf patch has been red as far back as I can remember.  It was always confusing why each patch color matched the neckerchief except Wolf (and perhaps Webelos).  With introduction of Lions the change makes sense.
    • And presumably he knows that, and has apparently decided that his granddaughter would be better off in the BSA than the GSUSA. I have a step-granddaughter who is of Cub Scout age and I have mentioned to my son-in-law (the girl's father) that she is (or soon will be) eligible to join the Cub Scouts, but his reply was basically that he is an atheist and is not interested in having his daughter in an organization that would not have him as a member.  He doesn't seem very interested in having her being a Girl Scout either.  I think it's kind of a shame, but she is not my child, nor my child's child, for that matter.  (I do have a grandson living 3,000 miles away from me, whose mother apparently still has not forgiven the BSA for banning gay people, even though they don't anymore.  I do still have hope for having a grandchild(ren) in Scouting through my son the Eagle Scout, who is married but is showing no signs of rushing into parenthood.) 
    • True, our Network Scouts are 18-25 but nevertheless to participate in the youth program you have to be aged 14-17 on the first day of the jamboree. If you are 18+ you can only go as an adult. So IST, unit leader, CMT etc. Those are WOSM rules. In practice most IST members are of the traditional Rover Scout age ie 18-25. This is the thing with WSJ. It is an international event. Not an event of the host country. Once on site it doesn't really matter where the host country is because it is a melting pot of different cultures, both scouting and non scouting. While the concept of teenage sex may sound particularly shocking in some countries in others it is seen far less so. Scandanavian countries in particular have that reputation although ironically they generally don't the lowest age of consent which in many European countries is 14 or 15. WSJ has to be set up to cope with a myriad of different attitudes and cultures.
    • Yep - I missed it - since its now in an appendix that deals mostly with working from heights and what the OSHA requirements are for doing so.  Thanks for pointing it out.
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