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  • LATEST POSTS

    • The earlier adopter program for Cubs required a minimum of 5 girls, not sure if that still applies
    • By firing/hiring an SM that agrees with their approach to advancement.
    • Family packs have no minimum number of girls.   Where does the 5 come from?
    • For our council roundup night we were told, regardless of whether your pack is accepting girls or not, regardless of whether you have the 5 minimum or not, register all girls and take their parent's money.  District/Council will find them a place.  I have no idea how many might have been affected as we had 0 girls show up.
    • Way back in the dark days, when I was but a boy and all transportation consisted of station wagons, our troop had a couple of "Canadian" tents. These monstrosities got brought out only when the travel times were short and the available station wagons were plentiful. Picture a smallish, circular, circus tent with sidewalls. The center (and only) pole broke down into two sections, but still had to be lashed to the roof racks as the halves were too big to fit in the cars. If I remember correctly, one station wagon could carry both canvases, but nothing else besides a front seat passenger. Three older Scouts could carry the canvas but four made the job easier. It took a real team effort to lay out the canvas, raise the center pole and stake out the "corners". Then the rest of the staking and guy-lines could be handled by a smaller crew. If the weather was nice (it never seemed to be so) the side walls could be rolled up and tied off for comfort. This tent could sleep up to 15, although I never remember more than 7-9 members of the Leadership Corps (remember those?) in there at a time. The tent's greatest asset, aside from sleeping an entire Patrol under one roof, was that, if properly set up, it could take a storm. The wind would just whip around it and blow on by. I remember one storm that blew down every poorly set-up Voyager tent in our campsite and a few of the well-set up ones too. The canvas of that Canadian tent just ruffled in the wind and we stayed snug, warm and dry.
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