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  3. My Jamboree Stories

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • I had some interesting conversations with my older (13-14 year old) scouts on Thursday night. With an expedition style hiking camp coming up in the spring I ran a session for the PLs and APLs about dealing with emergencies and how to take control of things if something goes wrong. We did a few role plays where I invited them in turn to be the one in charge in various scenarios including first aid, being lost, dealing with busy roads etc. As we went through I gave them some coaching on body language, tone of voice, keeping instructions simple, all that sort of thing. Generally how to come across as confident and how to keep things calm when something is going wrong or there is an element of risk. They did pretty well so I moved onto a scenario which was a bit more challenging was based on a real life incident I was involved in* some years ago. It was being in charge if an adult arrives on the scene who wants to do something daft. In this case I played the role of a bumbling adult who wants to move someone with a suspected broken leg, but who is in no immediate danger, while waiting for the ambulance. Essentially getting the scout to tell an adult clearly and firmly NO! I was genuinely surprised at how difficult they found it. It is of course something they are not used to, they are well used to doing as parents, teachers and, indeed, scout leaders tell them. They found the idea of saying no to an adult genuinely awkward and totally out of their comfort zone. I don’t know if that’s a reflection of our area or the kind of kids that come to scouts in that they generally do as they’re told. It brings up all kinds of questions in my mind. Is it the same the world over? Has it always been this way? And of course what age do we trust young people to over rule adults? Lots of things to ponder! I was curious how that would compare to your side of the pond. Would a 14 year old in the state find it hard to do that? On a darker note it did open my eyes to actually how vulnerable kids can be in terms of being drawn into crime, being abused etc. *I came across at RTA where a motocyclist had come off and was on the ground complaining of pains in their neck. There were a couple of other adults who were trying to remove the casualty’s helmet and were refusing to listen to a teenage girl, who turned out to be an air cadet, who was telling them not to and they wouldn’t listen till I backed her up. Even the paramedics didn’t attempt it! They got her on a spinal stretcher and off to hospital before attempting it.        
    • From discussions with pros, friends and experience, it is mixed.  Sometimes the SE knows but doesn't tell the subordinates.The DEs and other underlings find out from volunteers who get it from online sources. I know I have upset my SE twice now releasing info on the district webpage has been posted here or on FB, before the council has released anything. But on occasion, SE are surprised too. There was one instance where something got leaked by someone at National and it made the news. I forgot what it was, but it was allover the news. It was being posted here and on FB before SE's were informed. I was told the al SEs had a post 5PM Central time zone emergency conference call, and the DEs got one as soon as it was done
    • @carebear3895  the communication flow or lack there of has always amazed me. The fact the professionals do not (or claim to not know) about things before the volunteers is amazing.  The last fiasco on the rate increase where the councils feigned ignorance was ridiculous.   I was told that all the SEs have a weekly conference call with national and they didn't know anything until the press released it is either incompetence or dishonest.     Or if this is how national runs the organization, Mr. mosby has lots of work to do. JMHO.
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