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A place to chat about Scouting's biggest gathering

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  1. 2005 Jamboree

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  3. Jamboree 2017

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  4. Jamboree worth it?

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • There have been many stories of "retaliation" without recourse on these forums over the years.  Scouters and Scouts have had their memberships revoked for cause, and some for causes known only to the Scout Executives who seem to have the final say in such matters.
    • Facts entered into evidence: "The Council swiftly stopped the hazing, corporal punishment and inappropriate advancement procedures" The Council clearly indicates that something was wrong. The interpretation really isn't in question.   So some retaliation is warranted? Your position is that a scouter is warranted in taking negative action toward a parent if that parent didn't follow some undefined procedure in trying to fix a hazing incident? What is more important, that we stopped a hazing incident that could have lead to suicide or that a parent didn't follow the chain of command? The point of the OP appears to be rather clear. Regardless if you think a scouter might be justified in retaliation in some circumstances (), BSA doesn't appear to have a policy in place that protects whistleblowers and that is a significant problem.
    • In these parts they have e-days, so while they are not in school, students must log-in by a certain time, do their assignments, and it counts as a school day That way no extended days
    • Here in Ohio, there was a change made a few years ago where instead of requiring students to be in school for a specified number of days, they have switched to hours.  School districts have built in so many extra hours into the school days, that you'd have to be out of school for at least a month before you'd have to make up any time. Ohio used to give 5 "calamity days" (to be used for anything, not just weather) but since switching to the hours-based approach, those calamity days have gone away.  You just now need to be in school a specified number of hours during the year. And now that so many schools plan ahead for this by providing "blizzard bags" when they know there's a good chance for school to be called off due to weather, that that has cut down on the number of actual missed time. That and the fact that many school districts provide students with laptops, they can continue to do work from home, even on snow days. I can't recall any school districts around here that have had to make up days since they switched to the hours structure.
    • Check out Post 53  in Darien CT! Their program is quite old and well developed, but their Post exclusively covers EMS for the entire town and operates three ambulances. According to their website, they just received three new donated ambulances! They are the subject of a documentary, High School 9-1-1. Check out the trailer and show this next time someone tells you kids can't do anything!
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