Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. Update: alleged killer not competent to stand trial https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/crime_police/article_eb6c0eec-a018-11e8-9f17-f743e791ec2
  3. Getting back on my agism soabox ... how much worse would it have been to tell, the kid "Thanks for the 4 months leading our troop as a Life Scout. To round out your requirements Eagle, simply complete the requisite training for ASM and serve the remaining two months of your tenure serving our troop or one near your college."?
  4. Yes, it is an Eagle project. The requirement does not specify "while a Life Scout who has made rank by age 17.51..." Personally, I would not want to go through the hassle of the project workbook just to do a service project. However, for a scout with aspirations to be an engineer, it might be a worthwhile exercise. My kids (all chemical engineers -- not a creative bone in the lot of them) spend a lot of time filling out specs and tracking sheets and chasing approvals. The article seems to indicate that the scout did the math. But, anybody who gives $ to a scout because they think he'll get a medal out of it should be flogged. Either the project is worthy, and we should contribute to it, or it's just for bling, in which case we should give the kid a shovel and tell him to dig for silver.
  5. Yesterday
  6. "Any life scout who wants to do an Eagle project may do so. There is no reason deny him that privilege. I certainly would never say to a boy, "You can't do a project. You earned Life rank at age 17.51." No doubt that any Life Scout can do a project - is it still called an Eagle project if he has no way of earning Eagle? "Nobody besides the scout needs to pay attention. Nobody should. Even if nobody else is paying attention, he should read his Handbook." True nobody needs to pay attention but a scout is Friendly and I would have had him do the math when he became Star Scout or at least when he brought the project forward. He may have known when he started his project and hoped to squeeze through the cracks. Wonder if he got donations and help by telling people this was his Eagle project.
  7. Mac, your words really resonate. I was a shy, clumsy, disorganized scout. I really had to work hard to stay on track and earn the rank. On the trail to Eagle, I was in 3 different troops, with 4 different SMs (post Eagle, add 1 more troop and 3 more SMs). I spent a lot of time reading my handbook, and in my own way, figuring out what to do next. One benefit of the much-maligned 8th edition of the BSA handbook: all of the requirements for all of the merit badges were printed in the back. And unlike present times, National didn't feel the need to constantly change requirements. Collectively, the attitude from my parents and SMs: "It's up to you."
  8. Any life scout who wants to do an Eagle project may do so. There is no reason deny him that privilege. I certainly would never say to a boy, "You can't do a project. You earned Life rank at age 17.51." I might say, "You know that no matter how awesome this project is, you will not qualify for Eagle rank. But, you'll have something awesome to be proud of. And, if this is a conservation project and you think you'd like to do four more of these, come talk to me about the Hornaday award." Nobody besides the scout needs to pay attention. Nobody should. Even if nobody else is paying attention, he should read his Handbook.
  9. Semi-related reflection: I've been a member on several Eagle boards over the last few years.... Looking back, only a couple of the candidates could really stand on their feet and tell their story. The others were at a loss when asked specifics about their leadership experiences, their project, etc. Even easy/softball-type questions about their experiences on the scouting trail would bring about mumbling and vague answers. Without mom/dad/SM in the room feeding them the answers, they were at a loss. The board wasn't a big event for them, a chance to shine. No. It was just another thing they were told to do. A hurried project finished days before they aged out. It was a given they'd pass. You could tell. "You have to pass them. After all, they've met the requirements!" More than anything, this modern mantra has collectively cheapened the rank any Boy Scout wears, be it Tenderfoot or Eagle. (As well as it's ancillary mantra, "No retesting once they've earned the rank/badge, it's against the rules and just plain mean!")
  10. I don't know the details as I haven't seen the article, but...get ready for it...When I was in Scouts I constantly heard the SM and ASM reminding, warning, and generally nagging the older Scouts to get to work, to pay attention to their time qualifications. I was a fairly timid kid and this stressed me out. I was always looking ahead...admittedly I was not the most organized person but I tried to stay on top of things as best I could. Eventually I got my Eagle at 16 and was pretty proud of myself. Having low self-esteem most of those teen years, I felt if I could do it then surely anyone else could. And I had little patience for the older boys whining about how they didn't know what to do or they weren't going to make it. At summer camp when I met my first LDS troop they had a 14 and a 15 year old Eagle. Took me down a peg and really just blew me away. Sometimes it's the individual, sometimes it's the family or troop, but somewhere in the mix you have to have some drive to push past "good enough" and to soar. Cubs have a new book for each rank, Scouts only 1 and all the requirements are in it. Nothing hidden from lower ranks. Disappointment sucks. Rules are rules. He did the work, National made a decision, he is copacetic about it. I'm certain time-management will be at the front of his mind for awhile. But from here out, if he can get that much work done in such a short time I'd want him in OA. That kind of work ethic he could do a lot for the Lodge, maybe earn Vigil before he aged out. Or even after serving as an adviser.
  11. Sadly been that way for a little while. When I was a DE, one of my coworkers had his entire district advancement committee quit in protest. They denied a Scout Eagle, wrote up a plan for him to rectify the deficiencies, etc. He had plenty of time since he was 13 or 14 years olds. Grandfather (SM) Dad ( ASM) and Mom (COR/CC), blew a gasket and appealed to council. Council held up the decision, and it moved to national National rescinded the decision and gave him Eagle. I met the kid in question a few months later. From my conversation with him, I can see why he didn't receive Eagle initially. He could not tell me anything about any of his MBs. Another Eagle I know so screwed up his service project the benefiting organization, which had a long history of working with a BSA, kicked him off the property mid project, and has banned the Scouts from ever doing projects there again! The project was scheduled to be completed days before his 18th birthday. Long story short, mom threatened to sue the council over the matter, and they caved in. Sad thing is he never learned personal responsibility. I see his post of FB and he is always blaming someone else for his problems threatening legal action at times.
  12. $100 bet? I'm shocked...shocked to find gambling is going on here.
  13. He waited too long. It’s his problem, not BSAs. If I waited and did not give myself enough time, then it would be my poor time management skills. Thankfully, all I have left is the application.
  14. He already did, it was denied.
  15. I bet $100 he gets it if he appeals to National. I denied one recently for similar circumstances as SM, for a scout who had not been camping since 2014, had not correctly finished 5 eagle merit badges, never served in a position as Life, etc.. but the parents submitted what looked more like a legal brief to Council/National than a request, and in their letter made it sound like all of us leaders were incompetent, etc. And eventually after even the Council Eagle Committee who performed their investigation and reviewed it did not give their approval, still when they sent it with their non-recommendation to National, the Troop was still overruled by National, and so the Council gave him a board and approved his eagle anyway. None of us in the Troop were involved in the board, we refused. I got the feeling National and Council just wanted them to go away and gave them whatever they wanted so they would not go to court. That is the way it is these days.
  16. FireStone

    Recruiting Resources

    We're doing the same here, using the new "Scout Me In" stuff in local stores, libraries, etc. In trying to maximize exposure with limited budget, doing a short print run of color flyers that can be posted in public places puts a lot of eyes on our Pack info without doing a 1-flyer-1-family ratio. We targeted local places with high traffic and/or high numbers of kids and parents, like the community center, libraries, ice cream shops, supermarkets, etc. We're putting up posters in schools (5 schools, 5 posters, it's fairly inexpensive), digital flyers are send home through the school district "virtual backback" system, and we do a lot with social media and facebook especially.
  17. CherokeeScouter

    Denied a court of honor.

    That's simply not true.
  18. He had to know going into the project that his chance at the Eagle rank was going to hinge on the appeal process. It was a gamble all the way through. Some choice wording in the article, the author's bias is glaring. "Technicality derails Eagle bid..." You can't derail a train if gets started off the track. Is it still a "derailment" if a scout joins up at 16 and can't make Eagle? Is it still just a "technicality"? "It seems there's a rule requiring Eagle candidates to hold the rank of Life Scout for at least six months..." It seems? No, it's written, clearly. It's not some hidden language or ambiguous requirement, and it has existed for a long time. I have no issue with a scout doing a project and going through the appeal process in an attempt to earn rank. As mentioned, I suspect he knew all along that this was a risk to take. The appeal process exists to ask for clarification or a ruling on something. He kind of alluded to that in the article. But I do have issue with the suggestion by the author (and those seemingly in agreement in the scout's local community) that he was somehow "derailed" or otherwise unfairly treated.
  19. CherokeeScouter

    Denied a court of honor.

    Oh, we did a 60-second COH Monday night before the meeting. Outstanding kid, too. He was headed to college on Tuesday. We called the mother and son up before the whole troop, she pinned the medal on him, he gave Mom the parents' pin and Scoutmaster said a few kind words. And all the Crossovers and their parents were there. Pretty cool, if you ask me. The one time Crossovers were quiet. Please don't let these idiot leaders rain on your son's parade.
  20. CherokeeScouter

    Denied a court of honor.

    I think you need to go to your Council office and see if your son's Eagle was recorded. Here in Florida, the process is BOR, which then sends the App to National. National then notifies the local council, which in turn sends a letter to the Scout congratulating him and inviting him to come by the Scout Shop and get his credentials and Eagle presentation kit, which includes medal and patch. Then parents can hold a COH anytime they want. You do not need a troop. But you do need to make sure Council has your son recorded as Eagle. In fact, we had a Scout and parents who had some conflicts with the troop and held a COH totally separate from the Troop and at a different location. Only a select few were invited.
  21. CherokeeScouter

    SPL Charging $ to participate in games at camping event

    Taught the boys Black Jack at Winter Camp. Made enough to cover my Trading Post expenses. Separating a boy from his money through gaming teaches valuable life experience. 'A Scout is thrifty..."
  22. Eagledad

    Regulating Fall Risks and Nature

    Interesting post, thanks. Mrs. Barry and I brought home a new puppy to replace our Australian Shepard we recently lost to old age. My son brought our 2.5 year old granddaughter over to see the new puppy, but she was suddenly distracted by a ladder I left up after installing a ceiling fan. To her dad's (and grand parent's) surprise, she quickly ran strait to the ladder and climbed halfway up before her dad could get close enough to be a safety net. Later, my son said watching his daughter run to the ladder so quickly was the first time he understood his parent's concerns for when he took off to ride his bike down a hill as fast as he could go, or climb up large boulders at the state park. My response, "your daughter hasn't earned the scar under her chin yet", caught him a bit off guard. He paused for a minute, then smiled and asked her to go play with the puppy. In that moment, the puppy was safer. Thanks again T2eagle, I enjoyed the post. Barry
  23. Zebra132

    Membership Removal Procedures Booklet

    @NJCubScouter, this entire incident is getting blown out of proportion! The Council board members have been told not to talk to the Scout or the parent and has removed the parent from all the Council managed Facebook pages. Scout and parent are quietly working on his appeal.
  24. T2Eagle

    Regulating Fall Risks and Nature

    Humans can be terrible at properly assigning risks. The reasons for this are diverse and one of the more fascinating areas of psychology and human cognitive behavior. What we have here is an example of people assessing risk based on the behavior they see in others. If a person sees lots of other people doing something they then assume it's safe, if they see fewer people doing something they then assume it's risky --- even though both assessments are made in the absence of quantitative data. This is how you get foolish ideas like "lots of people climbing on slippery rocks on a cliff means its safe for me to do it" and the equally foolish " lots of people have become reluctant to let their adolescent offspring go unsupervised by adults, so we need a rule that says a patrol of scouts can no longer go anywhere unsupervised by adults." Our proper response as a society is to build institutions that can overcome these instinctual assessments. When it's clear that something is riskier than the group behavior would indicate, we need to put up signs and fences so that we use different cues to assess risk. When a behavior is safe even though undertaken by a few our institutions SHOULD act to overcome our fears not to reinforce them.
  25. Deadline, rule, and his responsibility.
  26. SSScout

    Can you not give it 100%?

    It sounds like your Pack and Den are active, involved, "For the Cubs". That is as it should be. But the Cub Den should be the "Gang" the kid (be they boy or girl) wants to hang out with. Camping is great, gets the kid ready for Boy Scouts, but there should be other stuff for the Cub too. Go to the zoo, go to the museum, the Police Station, the dad's work site, that model Railroad, camp out on a ship (Baltimore Harbor has this), visit a County Maintenance Garage, the State Environmental Protection Agency Lab, a newspaper printing plant, the Bus Transit Garage, anywhere that is DIFFERENT than school. Organize a softball league among the area Cub Packs, go to a minor league game, pro soccer game (call for "Scout Discounts"), University Astronomy Observatory or planetarium. The Pleides meteor shower came by this past weekend, given a dark clear sky, look for those opportunities to lay on the ground and just WATCH. MiF, KiS…..
  27. I have to think that somewhere along the line this scout received some bad information or very bad advice from some adults in his troop. I suspect the fact that the local council supported his appeal shows some indication of that. Unless no one was paying attention, he should have been well aware of the Life scout due date and that having missed that there was little or no chance of getting it waived to become Eagle. But as I tell every scout, and especially every parent, becoming an Eagle scout is a nice accomplishment, but not becoming an Eagle scout is not a sign of lack of accomplishment. ETA, he looks sharp in the uniform, everything where it should be.
  1. Load more activity
  • Posts

    • Update: alleged killer not competent to stand trial https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/crime_police/article_eb6c0eec-a018-11e8-9f17-f743e791ec2
    • Getting back on my agism soabox ... how much worse would it have been to tell, the kid "Thanks for the 4 months leading our troop as a Life Scout. To round out your requirements Eagle, simply complete the requisite training for ASM and serve the remaining two months of your tenure serving our troop or one near your college."?
    • Yes, it is an Eagle project. The requirement does not specify "while a Life Scout who has made rank by age 17.51..." Personally, I would not want to go through the hassle of the project workbook just to do a service project. However, for a scout with aspirations to be an engineer, it might be a worthwhile exercise.  My kids (all chemical engineers -- not a creative bone in the lot of them) spend a lot of time filling out specs and tracking sheets and chasing approvals. The article seems to indicate that the scout did the math. But, anybody who gives $ to a scout because they think he'll get a medal out of it should be flogged. Either the project is worthy, and we should contribute to it, or it's just for bling, in which case we should give the kid a shovel and tell him to dig for silver.
    • "Any life scout who wants to do an Eagle project may do so. There is no reason deny him that privilege. I certainly would never say to a boy, "You can't do a project. You earned Life rank at age 17.51." No doubt that any Life Scout can do a project - is it still called an Eagle project if he has no way of earning Eagle?    "Nobody besides the scout needs to pay attention. Nobody should. Even if nobody else is paying attention, he should read his Handbook."  True nobody needs to pay attention but a scout is Friendly and I would have had him do the math when he became Star Scout or at least when he brought the project forward. He may have known when he started his project and hoped to squeeze through the cracks. Wonder if he got donations and help by telling people this was his Eagle project.
    • Mac, your words really resonate.  I was a shy, clumsy, disorganized scout.  I really had to work hard to stay on track and earn the rank.  On the trail to Eagle, I was in 3 different troops, with 4 different SMs (post Eagle, add 1 more troop and 3 more SMs).  I spent a lot of time reading my handbook, and in my own way, figuring out what to do next.  One benefit of the much-maligned 8th edition of the BSA handbook:  all of the requirements for all of the merit badges were printed in the back.  And unlike present times, National didn't feel the need to constantly change requirements.  Collectively, the attitude from my parents and SMs:  "It's up to you."
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Popular Contributors

×