Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. I used to hold my OA flap on with two small safety pins. Done properly, you can’t see a thing.
  3. Today
  4. How are you trying to attach them @Haukehaien? Like others, I sew them by hand - though I dont bother with keeping the pocket usable. If it is going to be there very temporarily, I'll staple them and leave it at that.
  5. Eagle94-A1

    I HATE the new YPT rules

    UPDATE: Found out the young lady will NOT be attending the camp out last night. When the CM found out, she told the Tiger DL she didn't need to go. Tiger DL stated she will still be going, "if it's Scouting I'm going." And if she goes her Tiger goes. 😠 Family Scouting, you gotta love it.
  6. Eagle94-A1

    New girls in Scouting

    OK, I cannot find my old papers and what not. Going from memory. Girls mature faster because the onset of puberty starts earlier and the hormones released throughout the body. The hormones do affect behavior and that is why girls tend to be more organized and nurturing. I had some time yesterday at work to look up data, and it is very interesting. I have not read all the stuff, but from glancing over the material, women's brains and men's brains are different. Different portions of the brain control different aspects of behavior. Those areas vary in size and proportion to total brain size between males and females. Since puberty starts earlier for females than males, their brains actually increase in size rapidly faster and their brains may be larger than male brains at this point in life. Over time, male's brain size do catch up and then exceed females' brains by 8-12% BSA has come up with the "LINKED TROOPS" Model which allows the girls troop to share committee, equipment, meeting space and time, camp outs, and ASMs, If two troops are meeting at the same time, share the same leaders, and do activities at the same time and place, is it really 2 troops, or 1 troop? On paper it may be separate, reality says it's coed. And do not think this won't happen. Some packs, like the one I'm working with, have combined the girls' den with the boys' den for meetings. It is really a coed den. And at the town hall meeting I attended, I told my key three exactly what Scouters in my area told me, the girls' troops would be paper troops, they would be doing everything with the boys's troop. And many in my town hall agreed with that sentiment
  7. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    Riding a hatchet? Ouch! 😂
  8. shortridge

    New girls in Scouting

    Barry, I think we can end this particular line of discussion and agree to disagree on the meaning of “data.” For you it means life experiences; for me it means facts and statistics.
  9. GreenBarHill

    How Many Uniforms Do You Have?

    Where do I start..... I’ll break it down by era.. Currently all Cubmaster shirts. Oscar de la Renta 1980-2008 style: 1. Short Sleeve with 90s era knots, OA flap old style embroidered red numerals, old larger red Trained strip, silver mylar Cubmaster POR. World Crest with NO centennial border ring. 70s-90s era council camp temporary insignia. 2. Long Sleeve ODL with similar style as short sleeve above except for a pre 1983 khaki green background Eagle knot and a custom Cub Scout blue & silver Trained Strip. The OA flap on this one is my Lodge 25th anniversary/75th OA anniversary from 1990. (My favorite version of our lodge flap) with silver Mylar border. World Crest with NO outer 2010 border ring. 3. NOS ODL Short Sleeve (blank) still has the tags. 4. Spare ODL long sleeve (blank but experienced) 5. Experienced and well used ODL short sleeve. Currently in state of repair but serviceable. 6. ODL era dark green Venturing BSA shirt. Because you never know, the future is an open book and I want to be prepared. And I like the way the ODL shirts fit me. (2 Pairs of ODL era pants and red tabbed socks.) Centennial 2008-present style: 1. Short sleeve Cubmaster with technology “smokes pocket” all current style patches, knots and OA flap. Council Camp temporary insignia 2. Short Sleeve newer style poplin (without tech pocket) with 2000s-early 2010s era lodge flap. PWD pit crew temporary insignia. 3. Microfiber vented short sleeve with current insignia except the knots are late 90s era. Cub Scout summer camp patch as temporary insignia. 4. Long Sleeve early style Centennial with “smokes pocket” currently being put together for winter. Scout Sunday 2018 temporary insignia, knots and no lodge flap, yet. 3 pairs of Centennial switchback pants (2 cotton and 1 lightweight with the black belt) and several pairs of the current green socks 3 Red Jac Shirts (one 60s-70s era, one current style and one non BSA Bemidji Woolen Mills with double yolk and extra pockets) my personal favorite. 1 Olive green 2008-2011 BSA Jac Shirt. I do love the green ones, too! My final youth uniform (ODL long Sleeve) in the closet. Doesn’t fit anymore. I’m also currently putting together a mid 1960s-1971 era wool green long sleeve Cubmaster shirt with the then-current insignia (green diamond shape Cubmaster patch) , local red/white CSP and lodge flap of the day compete with garrison cap and official blue Cub Scout necktie for our Trunk Or Treat Pack Meeting and to maybe wear for other occasions. I’m also working on a circa 1972-76 era short sleeve khaki green “SCOUT BSA” shirt. Hats: ODL era red/green ball cap, current olive green ball cap, Campaign (Smokey the Bear) Hat. Neckties: 50s-60s Cub Scout Blue and 1980s ODL tan. Several Cub Bolos, Cub Leader necker and various other Neckerchiefs and slides. As Don Rickles might say “All kidding aside may I say, Sir from the bottom of my heart, you have a problem!” 😂 My Wolf age son loves the different uniforms and I enjoy talking with him and all of my Cubs about the different patches whenever they ask about them. My uniform pieces will most likely end up with my son someday. I’m a bit of a geek and a historian of sorts in my life both in and outside of Scouting.
  10. Saltface

    Qualities of an Eagle

    I haven’t read Game of Thrones, but I did have to read it twice while banjo music played in my head.
  11. Eagledad

    New girls in Scouting

    I gave a clear answer. Life’s collection of knowledge is data, no matter how it was collected. You can take it or leave it of course just like all the experience data that posters provide on this forum. If not, then what would be the point of requesting information from experienced members on subjects like, Starting a new troop: budget items. Collected experience data isnt always noted, recorded, and stored away because who would expect some shortridge down the road of life challenging that knowledge to sway opinion against our integrity. After all, if a person has the knowledge gained from the experience of starting a new troop, why would that person expect that data to be challenged? Is it so really so hard to believe girls are different from boys? Barry
  12. shortridge

    New girls in Scouting

    I’m still not seeing anything except some inartful phrasing on Bryan’s part to suggest that anything beyond Cubs is going to have a family-camping focus. The core Scouts BSA program is not changing. Besides: Most teens I know would rather lock themselves in their room for a year than go on “scheduled fun family time” with their parents and siblings.
  13. Needle and thread are your friend!
  14. Eagle94-A1

    New girls in Scouting

    Don't know how I missed that. Looks like the DEN METHODS is the future of Scouting.
  15. Ranman328

    New girls in Scouting

    Don't be so sure. Some of these Scouts come up with some interesting ideas.
  16. mds3d

    Qualities of an Eagle

    ^This is the only relevant portion of the requirements for Eagle. Does the scout have an answer to this question? Where has he violated the oath and law that others have not? If you are interpreting this from a Christian perspective, I refer you to James 2:10 "For whoever keeps the whole law and yet stumbles at just one point is guilty of breaking all of it. (NIV)" Is your board of review going to hold every scout to keeping the law perfectly? Are Eagles supposed to be sinless? As for the scoutmaster in your second example, I think he was in the wrong and wish the scout would appeal that decision to a higher authority.
  17. shortridge

    Qualities of an Eagle

    Was I the only one who read this and initially had an image of the Lannisters pop to mind?
  18. Yesterday
  19. For about a buck a piece, our local Scout Shop sells transparent plastic patch holders that fasten to your shirt via the button on the right hand pocket. They're available in a circle shape that fits the "standard" round patch (the size of a position of responsibility patch) and a square shape that fits the less standard square size and some of the odd-ball shaped patches. The holders aren't super tough however, so they're not suitable for all occasions. But I use them to switch out patches about once a month for our Pack meetings since I accumulated a few during my youth. All that being said, sewn patches will take a lot more abuse. I recommend sewing with long stiches pulled snug rather than many short stiches pulled really tight. That way the patches can be sewn on quicker, should lay flat and will be easier to use you seem ripper to remove when you're ready to switch patches. Good luck!
  20. fred johnson

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    Ya know ... troops just don't need to build up that much stuff. Usually troops have way way way more stuff then they need for a camp out. If you are asking "budget" ... part of the budget is who pays for what. Who pays camping fees? Are scouts paying per camp out or does troop cover from general fund part of the camping fee Who pays food? Does a scout collect and then spend from that? Or does a patrol member submit a receipt for food to the troop treasurer? How is the troop funded? I ask as it majorly affects your budget plans? In one troop, the troop charges $20 to $25 for each camp out. Then they tack on another $5 for materials. Fuel. Stove. Etc. The goal is the troop should come out ahead by a few days per person per camp out. That money builds up to be how they pay for tents and other equipment. But you can do it other ways too. Fundraisers. Or have scouts bring the equipment. Or .... It really is a double sided budget. Not just what do you need to spend, but how do you raise those funds too.
  21. qwazse

    Qualities of an Eagle

    Sounds like the sister would be in the dog house after that recommendation!
  22. I agree with sewing as the best strategy. Obviously, that means a fella can't swap out a temporary patch but once a year while taking online YPT (that might be the only spare time someone has) ... so choose your absolute favorite. Mine's been on for nearly 40 years (actually hopped from shirt to shirt once ).
  23. The Latin Scot

    How do you keep the [deleted] temporary patches from falling off?

    Are you referring to temporary patches as worn on the right pocket? Well, I just sew them on when I want to wear them on my uniform. When I want to switch out the old patch for a new one, I remove the former with a small seam-ripper, then I sew the new one right on the pocket (by hand so that I can still use the pocket). The whole process takes only 10 - 20 minutes depending on size of the patch. So far, none have ever fallen off my shirt. So, my experienced recommendation is: the ol' needle n' thread.
  24. thrifty

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    Our troop charges $30 above the required fee. This provides a necker, slide, patrol patch and advancement/MBs the first year. All campouts including summercamp are charged separately in advance. Try and network. Does someone's grandfather or someone at the CO own some property where you can camp? What about shooting sports/hunting clubs in the region? beg and borrow equipment in the beginning. many communities have facebook pages devoted to local happenings, post that the new troop is looking for tents and items that might be taking up space in someone's garage. people are happy to help the scouts when they can and maybe that old tent will only last a year but by then there should be some fundraiser money in the bank. Also, depending on what tents you eventually buy, do not pay retail! Several companies give scout discounts on tents. we sell popcorn and do an annual fundraiser as well. the two combined replace any needed tents and purchase any new equipment like staves or rope. our troop also assists with leadership training costs so some cash goes there.
  25. scoutldr

    Qualities of an Eagle

    They took "A Scout is Friendly" to a whole new level. I was once the District Rep on an EBOR and as we were reading the letters of recommendation, one was from his sister who was heaping praise on her brother for being such a good father. The two were still "living in sin" under her parents' roof. Well, the Troop Committee members were livid, primarily because we were blindsided by the SM who thought it wasn't "relevant". It was not a unanimous vote. The scout appealed to Council, who rubber stamped it. The CO was a Methodist Church.
  26. I don't generally wear the temporary patches, but occasionally want to. When I do, they ALWAYS fall off at some point. Is there a good way to keep them affixed? Should I just give up? TIA.
  27. fred johnson

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    I've been in multiple troops that do it differently. Scouts bringing their own tent makes life easier for the adults. BUT, there are lots of benefits to the troop owning the tents. It gives the QM something meaningful to do. It gives the troop things to do at meetings (setup, clean, put away, etc). It's also a great leveling aspect as everyone has the same stuff. It doesn't become a competition for who has the best tent. Also, you can avoid scouts bringing party tents. I swear half the trouble at night is when you have five or six scouts sharing one tent. There is something about two in a tent that causes them to fall asleep faster. Most importantly, everyone having matching tents makes for a sharp looking camp site. Our troop had matching tents for ten plus years. We replace one every other year or so. Now, I'd say we are at about one new tent a year and we have 15+ in our trailer. For a new troop, I'd avoid big cost items. Heck, I'd think it might be cool to have a patrol go to a second hand shop (goodwill, savers, ...) and have them pick out what they need. Silverware. Plates. Cups. Skillets. Etc. It would be a cool way to stock a patrol. Plus, when the patrol crashes, donate that patrol's stuff and let the new patrol go shopping again. I bet you could get most of the cook stuff for under $20 from a second hand shop. Except lanterns and stove.
  28. qwazse

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    The problem about tarps (and most modern tents with low-slung flys) in winter: to keep "exhalation frost" from building up on everything, it's actually best to allow for a lot of ventilation. So the trick is proper alignment of vents, and bodies. That requires lots of practice that 1st years obviously do not have. In the days canvas floorless tents, piling snow around piled around the walls of the tent not only blocked wind, but attracted condensation. So even in calm frozen nights when the flaps weren't kicking open, canvas walls were frost-free on the inside. (Although folding them at the base could be rough if you packed the snow to tight!)
  1. Load more activity
  • Posts

    • I used to hold my OA flap on with two small safety pins. Done properly, you can’t see a thing.
    • How are you trying to attach them @Haukehaien? Like others, I sew them by hand - though I dont bother with keeping the pocket usable.  If it is going to be there very temporarily, I'll staple them and leave it at that.
    • UPDATE: Found out the young lady will NOT be attending the camp out last night. When the CM found out, she told the Tiger DL she didn't need to go. Tiger DL stated she will still be going, "if it's Scouting I'm going." And if she goes her Tiger goes. 😠 Family Scouting, you gotta love it.
    • OK, I cannot find my old papers and what not. Going from memory. Girls mature faster because the onset of puberty starts earlier and the hormones released throughout the body. The hormones do affect behavior and that is why girls tend to be more organized and nurturing. I had some time yesterday at work to look up data, and it is very interesting. I have not read all the stuff, but from glancing over the material, women's brains and men's brains are different. Different portions of the brain control different aspects of behavior. Those areas vary in size and proportion to total brain size between males and females. Since puberty starts earlier for females than males, their brains actually increase in size rapidly faster and their brains may be larger than male brains at this point in life. Over time, male's brain size do catch up and then exceed females' brains by 8-12% BSA has come up with the "LINKED TROOPS" Model which allows the girls troop to share committee, equipment, meeting space and time, camp outs, and ASMs, If two troops are meeting at the same time, share the same leaders, and do activities at the same time and place, is it really 2 troops, or 1 troop? On paper it may be separate, reality says it's coed. And do not think this won't happen. Some packs, like the one I'm working with, have combined the girls' den with the boys' den for meetings. It is really a coed den. And at the town hall meeting I attended, I told my key three exactly what Scouters in my area told me, the girls' troops would be paper troops, they would be doing everything with the boys's troop. And many in my town hall agreed with that sentiment
    • Riding a hatchet? Ouch! 😂
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Popular Contributors

×