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  2. SSF

    Scout Dishonesty During an Eagle Project

    What does "initial time" mean? Was there an agreed upon time to meet?
  3. The Latin Scot

    BSA Executive Salaries

    I've been thinking a lot about this over the past few days. I do indeed see things differently, though not in the ways many seem to think. I know this may not be the thread for this, but it is in response to a comment made in this thread, so I knew not where else to post it - moderators may remove it to a more appropriate thread without objection from me if that better serves the integrity of this topic. First of all, people are trying to "sequence" events, trying to determine which came first - a church move to exit Scouting, or incoming policy changes which the church found objectionable. I think the question is at this point irrelevant. Asking how we got to this point is no longer what matters - the question is, where are we now, and where will that lead us? For the church, growth continues throughout the world, in many lands at astronomical rates - Latin America, Western Africa, the Philippines - all are seeing incredible growth, and such continues in all other nations and domestically as well. It makes sense that we would want to unify all our members, and that starts with teaching the children (something every Scouter will appreciate). By unifying our programs, we are unifying youth all over the world in a shared program that will build harmony of faith, ideals, fellowship, understanding, and morality. Scouting has been a wonderful asset in helping the church understand the essentials of building successful foundations in the growth of young men - now we are equiped to create an equally effective program, but centered on our own unchanged and unchanging moral beliefs. For Scouting, those core moral beliefs are no longer clear. Unlike the church, which has a clear leadership structure based on one shared doctrinal foundation, Scouting must share the moral and philosophical beliefs of many hundreds of religions and ideologies - and far more so, it can be affected by popular opinion and partisan agendas. When the moral fiber of its society is srong, Scouting itself is all the stronger for it, because its leadership is inherently built out of an amalgamation of shared ideals. But when that society becomes divisive, demanding changes to the core values which Scouting once clung to, Scouting itself does not have the internal structural integrity required to withstand the pressure - in other words, Scouting does not have the inherent authority to repulse outside influences forever. The Boy Scouts of America has held out far longer than most other world Scouting organizations (Scouting UK's recent push to make its Scouts "employable" reflects drastically a complete abandonment of Baden-Powell's purpose of building men of character and not material ambition). For over 100 years, the BSA still believed that boys needed a special place of their own, a place where their unique character, temperment, energy and zeal for life could find a safe, healthy outlet - a place where they could commune with each other, with nature, and with God. Now, its internal structure, which was originally designed to openly allow invested, caring adults to share a guiding hand in protecting that environment, has been hijacked and usupred by conspiring men and women determined to use the BSA and its proud heritage as a platform from which to push their own selfish and destructive societal agendas - and the young men of this country are their primary targets. Now, it seems, they are winning greater and greater victories. Now girls are coming in, crowding out the safe space boys should have enjoyed by signing up for a program that wasn't designed for them, and which simply will not serve them like it serves boys. And so eventually changes will be made, and boys will slowly lose all the benefits that Scouting was meant to offer them. They will become marginalized in their own program. They will eventually be taught in Scouting that immoral behaviors should be tolerated, even celebrated. And soon this organization will no longer be the Boy Scouts of America. They will cling to that name for a while, till the advantages of that name are used up, and eventually it too is dropped. But already, that orginal program of over one hundred years, is almost gone. It may become a fun program, it may become an instructive program - but will not be the same program. That program, the Boy Scouts of America, the one founded by Baden-Powell, Beard, Seton, West, Hillcourt - that program does not exist anymore. The images you see in the Rockwell paintings, of boys in the woods and on the streets, in churches, communities, shelters, hospitals, backyards and living rooms, boys camping, fishing, serving, helping, caring - they are of an organization I believe will soon no longer exist. And so. Whereas before I felt that I was sad to leave, I realize now that to say Scouting is losing me would be a falsehood. Not that losing one volunteer would make any difference, but that I - that our nation - we are losing Scouting. The quote above stated "Who the BSA admits is less important to me than the core mission of bringing Scouting to the youth in the program." And this is just the tragedy. Scouting will no longer be brought to them, because Scouting is not simply the activities, the achievements, the adventures. It is the boys themselves who for 108 years have been blessed and protected within this inspired program. And now they no longer have it; it belongs now not to them, but to outside powers making changes that the boys cannot control, and cannot stop; and being young, they do not realize fully what is being stolen from them, nor will they be given the power to rescue it themselves. So yes, at the end of next year I will no longer be a part of Scouting. I will continue to deliver the program will all my heart, mind, and strength until then, within my unit, as the walls crash around me. But I will be sad (albeit not surprised) to find that I have stayed in my place, while Scouting has moved to a different world altogether. These decisions have not "overshadowed the core program." I believe they reject it entirely, but will inevitably use it only as long as it is useful to them. I only pray for the sake of the boys who remain that such will last for a small time longer at least. In many units with dedicated, inspired and visionary leaders, it may last much longer. I believe there will be many pockets of successful, true Scouting scattered all over the nation, and I look forward to hearing their stories of success against the waves of compelled change. But I will have other battles to fight then, and other programs to nurture, and other flocks to tend. I hope however that I and those brave units will be able to depend on each other for support and encouragement whenever we may we call upon each other. My prayer is that those future alliances will ever hold strong against whatever troubles may come.
  4. The Latin Scot

    2018 Guide to Insignia and Awards

    Yeah, a lot of the information in this is outdated - is this really the latest edition? EDIT: The copyright date does indeed say 2015. If there is a new 2018 edition, the files at the link aren't it.
  5. BigDale

    Las Vegas Area Council Donation

    Thank, I'll order some and test them out. Dale
  6. BigDale

    Las Vegas Area Council Donation

    I've gone through Wood Badge and served on staff a couple times. I'm a Fox. Which also happens to be my patrol animal. But your right about "trickle down" respect and pride. I took all the stuff in today and is being used tomorrow at a day camp. I'm working the next 4 day camps so I know the tools will be taken care of. I'll miss the next one but by then I'll have a manual together and a sign in/out procedure that will make a single person responsible for the tools. So if anything is missing that district would have to pay for it. We'll see what happens. Dale
  7. BigDale

    Las Vegas Area Council Donation

    I don't qualify to itemize but I get the receipt anyways because I know people that do.
  8. BigDale

    Las Vegas Area Council Donation

    Thanks, I am going to order a set and try them out.
  9. Sorry for the late response. I am still learning how this site works. That is a difficult question. Cost is a very real concern because even the smallest projects can be expensive. But my main concern is that the kids make something they will actually use. And a rounder isn't it. I consider those practice pieces. And repeating projects every year is no fun also. Here are some thoughts: Neckerchief slides are good projects would be used every time the uniform is worn. Especially if the whole pack makes them with a common design. They can be bought in packs of 100 at a cost of about 65 cents. Add a foot long piece of leather lace and maybe some beads and you have a nice item. Comes out to less than 1.00 each Wallet - A very good project because in involves different pieces of leather and some lacing. It's a good project for the webelos because they will have an ID card from school and a place to keep money. But the cheapest kit I've found is still 9.00 each. Wristband - I like these but I've discovered that the kids don't wear them very long. I think it is because most scouts want to just stamp as much as they can fit on them and there is no design. Around 2.00 each depending on size. Bookmark - This is a simple and often overlooked project but having them make one for use with their scout handbooks will keep the project used for a long time. These can be purchased for less than 1.50 each in bulk. Book Cover - I think this is a great project for Boy Scouts. There are a lot of customizing options with this project and the scouts can get very creative and really make it their own. It is also a good project for tooling. But this is a very expensive project. My price at Tandy is about 25.00 each. Key Fob - A good project for older scouts because they will be driving. Or younger scouts can make one for their parents. I also let the parents make one if they want to. The key to this project is a wide variety of 3d stamps. But most programs don't have a large number of stamps. I just donated over 200 3d stamps to our council's Day Camp program so they could have 4 identical bins of tools. So, along with their stamps, I put together 4 identical sets of 60 stamps each. And I still don't think 60 is enough of a variety. I have about 400 different stamps and there are about 350 that I don't have. Anyways, these cost less than 1.00 each. Coin Purse - Admittedly this is a better option for Girl Scouts but if I was doing a class just before mother's day or Christmas this is a good present for mom. The kit I would use runs about 5.00 each Mystery Bracelet - There is not much stamping you can do on these but the cool thing about it is how it is braided. You can even get these pre-finished so all you have to do is the braiding. Unfinished ones at Tandy are around 2.00. Rounders - I consider these practice pieces but can be used for multiple projects. Coasters are obvious, but punch a button hole at the top and a small hole at the bottom with a piece of lace running through to add beads to and you have an award "patch" Make sure they stamp the name of the event on it and the date. Depending on size they run about .50 each Leather Braided Bracelet - I think this is a great project because braided bracelets are still "in". There are a lot of designs that use no hardware so that keeps the cost down. There are also a bunch of colors of round leather lace in different sizes so that leaves tons of options. Plus the Leatherwork Merit Badge requires a braided project. And let me tell you that using plastic lace and even paracord for that requirement is not real popular with the kids, but sooooo widely used. Once again we come to cost. I'm still looking for the best prices on the internet so I don't feel comfortable listing any. Leather shapes. There are a lot of leather shapes you can purchase and design a project around them (like all 50 states). Costs vary but are reasonable. So these are the project ideas that I have right now. I want to do a more research with actual kids to see what they would really want. So I'm thinking of starting a few leathercraft clubs at some of high schools and middle schools in my area. An important factor that I've mentioned several times above is design. I think that if the kids got a bunch of scraps to stamp all over and get it out of their system then we could concentrate on design. Starting with a name, initials or 3d stamp and a nice border. is all they need for most projects. Another really important factor is the finishing of the projects. That is why I want to spread the class to two meetings. The 2nd meeting is for dyeing, finishing and assembly. Not just a clear coat, but giving the kids a choice of colors. I think Tandy's Professional water based dyes come in 23 colors. I want to be able to offer each of them. Once again cost comes into play. So where do you draw the line? I don't know. I want to do some fundraising to raise a bunch of money so I can provide all the dyes, paints, finishes, varieties of lace, etc... Who knows, maybe even offsetting at least part of the cost of the projects. Buying the projects in bulk saves a lot but has a big upfront cost. It comes down to how much the troop or pack wants to spend. By not having to purchase tools every year they could spend more on projects. So there is that. As far as my actual plan, I'm still working on it. I'll probably let the unit pick the projects and charge them slightly above cost plus a fee for replacement of the dyes, paper towels, disposable gloves, etc... maybe 25.00. Still working out the details on that part. I'm not trying to make money, I just don't want to lose any. Dale
  10. BSA, national and local, clearly sees an existential threat and is taking a broad approach to countering it. I think the BSA is intentionally making two changes under the transition to "Family Scouting" and is making another change as part of the broader approach. I will term these three changes inclusion, institutionalism, and consumerism. 1) Inclusion: They clearly want to quickly juice the numbers by admitting girls. This is part of the reboot around gays etc. I assume that in the next few years all the added God bothering in the requirements will disappear and we'll end up with a nearly secular group. Uniforming could become lighter like Scouts UK of could move to optional uniforms like Venturing or Scouts Canada. I'm enthusiastic about these changes and don't think the doubters' concerns will come to pass. 2) Institutionalism: This change is part of the goal to raise revenue and not purely related to "Family Scouting". BSA and councils clearly want to generate big home run projects without having to build programs slowly from the ground up. This is obvious in STEM Scouts. I can imagine a great BSA stem-only initiative. My kids have been in a local maker group that could be a great model. DIY.org could be a model. All loosely structured and maker led. Partnering with Team America Rocketry Challenge, which schools and 4H use, could be a plan. Patriotic, potential large donors, could partner with NAR, fits with Cub Scout launch themes and BS merit badges. But instead STEM Scouts is something delivered in schools in a school-y format where they offer the program, BSA "provides" volunteers and collects fees. Likewise, at the council level I see the desire for these home runs. Our council has built a new $17million headquarters and most of the justification about community engagement. They aren't only or perhaps even primarily looking to support units. Before the upgrade they had a ropes course and climbing wall. Now they have a "leadership lab". It is fairly clear their goal is to sell leadership course to the schools and corporations. Sign your entire student council up for a multisession leadership training.... just like NLTY w/o the camping. The camps are also building lodges whose main purpose seems to be recruiting school environment education field trips, despite currently lacking staff to support that. These more structured projects seem speculative and out of the current mission of BSA. 3) Consumerism: It seems like "Family Scoutng" is an excuse to monetise the current membership as much as possible. Out council has added $100+ council dues in the last couple years, perhaps to fund the building spree. I assume National will be heading towards $100 dues shortly. Scouts Canada showed a pretty linear inverse trend of enrollment and dues. Hopefully open enrollment of girls can delay these huge dues hikes. That last Scout Stuff Flyer looked like an REI catalog. The councils are trying to sell family camp and so is national. Philmont Family Week is underwhelming. Everything at The Summit is worse. It has always seemed like a unsuccessful money grab. The ATV stuff violates outdoor ethics and reeks of pay to play. These are all consumerist vacations, not real adventures. I'd look for a lodge at Philmont and an every other year Family Rendevous at Summit between Jambos and lots more marketing of expensive deluxe family events. Its Scouting as a lifestyle brand. So I think the core Scouts BSA program may be strengthened by recent inclusion changes but overall the adventurous core program will likely be marginalized by other trends completely unrelated to girls.
  11. qwazse

    Just curious about background

    1st generation scout (although my brother, two decades my senior made it a very LONG generation). Cousin Bill locked the football hall of fame, so I - being flat footed and more into distance than speed - figured I'd appropriate my brothers' gear and hike/camp the tar out of it, becoming the family's 1st Eagle Scout in the process. Poor Mrs. Q hates rain, but had to endure a lot of camping vacations with it on account of how much rain likes me and looks forward to meeting me for a day or two when I'm out. Needless to say when Son #1 joined Cubs, then Scouts, then Daughter joined venturing, and Son #2 followed suit, she was more than happy to see us out the door! I've been ASM and a Crew Advisor, and general grunt at district and council events. I'm currently an advisor on our council venturing committee. I love BSA4G, I hate that some scouters can't work with it, I especially feel that BSA's inability to drop marketing doublespeak makes matters worse. But ... I can't help remembering my 1st Venturing summit, and I was walking from camp and passed two young ladies on the trail. They returned my greeting with warmth and smiles, and I thought, "This is what I'm working for."
  12. I just was watching the video with Bryan and Anthony Berger (sp?). What was the deal with the neckercheifs they were wearing? Did I miss a topic somewhere?
  13. Chris1

    Just curious about background

    I am all in favor of giving girls the opportunities in Scouting and think it is long overdue. I am excited that Ventures and Sea Scouts will be joining us in the Order of the Arrow, again long overdue. I have been continuously in Scouting since I was first allowed as a Wolf. I am an Eagle Scout, OA vigil, worked on summer camp staff for 5 years as a youth working from CIT up to Director of Program, then Assistant Ranger. I have been on staff for local high adventure programs since 17 years old. I have been Asst Den Leader, ASM, ADC, Roundtable Commissioner, ADC for Roundtable, District training staff in 2 districts, commissioner training staff, instructor at college of Commissioner Science. <<taking a deep breath>> I am a Wood Badge Bear, I am the 2018-2019... University of Scouting Dean of Scout training, NYLT ASM since 2017, attending NYLT Course Director's Conference in 2017, started "Junior Leader Roundtable" for my district at 13 or 14, and ran it until I left for college. As an adult I revived the idea as "Youth Leadership Roundtable" in my new district, while helping with OA chapter and staffing Lodge events. I am a unit trainer and committee member for 4 LDS units, ASM for my son's troop(non-LDS). And I am probably leaving some stuff out. As an aside, I come from a scouting family. Both of my parents and my brother(Eagle Scout) are all registered scouters since he joined the pilot Tiger Cub program. All are also vigil honor. Both parents are Wood Badgers, have been District and Council trainers, both Chapter Advisors, both received Silver Beaver and District Award of Merit. Both District Committee, both Eagle advisors.... And they all think the change are great, though Dad does not see the purpose in forcing the girls into a separate troop. And that does not even get into my wife and her parents. (this post is long enough as it is) Oh, I left out I have my Masters in Commissioner Science and working on my thesis for my doctorate. I knew there was at least one thing I forgot. ..... Oh and District committee.
  14. Respectfully, I see it differently. The program of the BSA really have never been the primary problem for the BSA. It's been loss of interest. Changing the basics of the program won't help. What will help is a concerted effort to make it more fun. Not fun through different badges, but more fun through a better understanding and application of the program we already have.
  15. That's one of my few purist hopes. I do not want to see the uniform go away.
  16. ParkMan

    Committee Members for BORs

    We have an assistant Advancement Chair the serves as the Board of Review Coordinator. He's generally at meetings twice a month. We ask scouts to contact him ahead of time to let him know, but it's not a strict rule. If a scout shows up and requests one, he'll organize it on the spot if possible. Part of the role of the BOR Coordinator is to develop training materials for adults. We will have any non ASM sit on a BOR. It could be a parent or Committee Member. Over time, the BOR Coodinator has built up enough folks that are knowledgeable in conducting a board that we always have a lead adult who is experienced and two other adults who may or may not be. This has worked very well for us and has been a great way to get an outgoing parent involved.
  17. ParkMan

    Just curious about background

    I think it has less to do with Scouting history and a lot more to do with geography. I'm east coast born, raised, and educated. I live in a pretty progressive city and have for 20 years. I'd suggest if we do that, let's start a separate thread. I think that cuts down on the tendency to try & convince others.
  18. ParkMan

    Just curious about background

    I'm excited about the recent changes as well. Initially I was apprehensive about girls, but after a couple of months I thought it through and am very excited about it. I'm a father with a son and two daughters. I love my daughters dearly and want them to have the same opportunities that I did. They are both Girl Scouts now and may stay that way - it's their choice. But, I'm very excited that they have the opportunity to benefit from the program that I did. I was a Cub Scouts and earned Arrow of Light. I was a Boy Scout and stopped at Star. I was not OA. As an adult, I've not been a Scoutmaster - but have been: Asst. Cubmaster, Cubmaster, Den leader, Pack Committee Chair, Troop Committee Chair, Crew Committee Chair, and District Committee member. My brother is a Life for Life and OA member. My father was an Eagle, Webelos Den leader, and Cubmaster. My grandfather a Scoutmaster and Silver Beaver recipient. Scouting has very deep ties in our family.
  19. Chris1

    Just curious about background

    I was just thinking from a scientific and statistical analysis standpoint it would be good to have information from both sides. I get the feeling that many people feel the majority of scouters are on THEIR side, and those that disagree are a "crazy fringe group" . So if we all give our opinion along with our background maybe we will see a device along age, or when they started as a scouter, or geography, or district/council involvement, or involvement is specific programs, or if commissioners tend to feel one way, while those who have attended jamboree feel another, or if training staff tend to differ from those who have attended 2 or more national high adventure bases. Etc Let us all TRY to stay respectful, and accept the right of others to have a DIFFERENT opinion.
  20. John-in-KC

    Committee Members for BORs

    To me, It's COURTEOUS for a Scout to ask the CC or Advancement coordinator to arrange for a BOR at next weeks' meeting. Time matters to volunteers, and as part of Adult Association, Scouts should learn other people's time matters. As a BOR chair, a couple times I had such a thorny response to a question I adjourned the BOR without a result until the next week, to give myself time to consult with the SM, Commish, and District Advancement Operating Committee Chair.
  21. Yesterday
  22. gblotter

    Committee Members for BORs

    There is nothing hard and fast about our scheduling. We are sensitive to individual needs. The main benefit of scheduling BOR every three months is that it lights a fire under the boys to work toward that date. Otherwise procrastination takes over.
  23. CalicoPenn

    If men carry purses, what would be in yours

    During the week, I have my briefcase with me - it's more of a tech bag to hold my computer (a Microsoft Surface) but it's got lots of pockets where I carry a leatherman tool, a flashlight, a small personal first aid kit, eyeglass repair kit, eyeglass microfiber cleaning cloth, a bottle of acetaminophen, a digital camera with spare batteries and a charger, and a spare bandana. Pens, pencils and paper should go without saying. In my car I have two seat back organizers from Duluth Trading. One has a large first aid kit, a tool kit (wrenches, screwdrivers, etc.), a roll of tp (in a Ziploc), ice scrapers, a large flashlight (LED), spare batteries, extra ziplocs, a road triangle set (one of the new-fangled cloth kind), jumper cables, duct tape, a trowel, a space blanket (someone gave me one and it was a handy place to put it), a small umbrella (fits in a case about the length and width of a smart phone) and a micro-fiber towel. The other has pretty much everything I carry in my briefcase (except the computer and camera) and also a box of tissues, a plastic cup, a couple of books (I find short stories are best), spare batteries, a small High Spirit's flute, a small dinner set (small plate, knife, fork, spoon, paring knife, small cutting board, and cloth napkin), some paracord, some carabiners, and the most important thing - my Buddy Bison stuffed animal on a carabiner clipped to the organizer in such a way as to watch the world go buy as I'm driving. Ok - so maybe this is a little overboard but I do spend a lot of time in my car. Otherwise, when I'm hiking I carry a "Possibles Bag" - with the standard flashlight, spare battery, knife, first aid kit, a small bit of duct tape (in the first aid kit), etc. that a prepared Boy Scout would have.
  24. CalicoPenn

    Just curious about background

    I don't know that we really do know that. I know a number of them are all "Real Scouts" but it's also been my experience that some of the most ardent defenders of "Eagle Scout Standards" have never been Eagle Scouts themselves.
  25. oldbuzzard

    Just curious about background

    Not really. We know they are all "Real Scouts"... I think the goal here is to prove or disprove the credentials of the "liberal" wing. From the responses so far it should be clear that the inclusive group is just as involved and hence we can move on from the "no true Scotsman" fallacy...
  26. Chris1

    Just curious about background

    I think it would also be interesting to have the same background on those who disapprove of these changes
  27. CalicoPenn

    Just curious about background

    I think it's about time for both girls in Scouts and Venturers/Sea Scouts in OA . And since you did put it in I&P, but not necessarily meaning to open a can of worms, I'm looking forward to when the BSA finally gets out of the discrimination game altogether and allows agnostics and atheists to join. Arrow of Light, Eagle Scout, OA Vigil Honor, OA Chapter Chief, Lodge Vice Chief, National Camp School Day Camp Program, National High Adventure Base staff (Okpik before it became a Council/Unit program - and summer session), Assistant Scoutmaster, Scoutmaster, District Committee, Unit Committee and Merit Badge Counselor.
  1. Load more activity
  • Posts

    • What does "initial time" mean?  Was there an agreed upon time to meet?
    • I've been thinking a lot about this over the past few days. I do indeed see things differently, though not in the ways many seem to think.  I know this may not be the thread for this, but it is in response to a comment made in this thread, so I knew not where else to post it - moderators may remove it to a more appropriate thread without objection from me if that better serves the integrity of this topic. First of all, people are trying to "sequence" events, trying to determine which came first - a church move to exit Scouting, or incoming policy changes which the church found objectionable. I think the question is at this point irrelevant. Asking how we got to this point is no longer what matters - the question is, where are we now, and where will that lead us? For the church, growth continues throughout the world, in many lands at astronomical rates - Latin America, Western Africa, the Philippines - all are seeing incredible growth, and such continues in all other nations and domestically as well. It makes sense that we would want to unify all our members, and that starts with teaching the children (something every Scouter will appreciate). By unifying our programs, we are unifying youth all over the world in a shared program that will build harmony of faith, ideals, fellowship, understanding, and morality. Scouting has been a wonderful asset in helping the church understand the essentials of building successful foundations in the growth of young men - now we are equiped to create an equally effective program, but centered on our own unchanged and unchanging moral beliefs. For Scouting, those core moral beliefs are no longer clear. Unlike the church, which has a clear leadership structure based on one shared doctrinal foundation, Scouting must share the moral and philosophical beliefs of many hundreds of religions and ideologies - and far more so, it can be affected by popular opinion and partisan agendas. When the moral fiber of its society is srong, Scouting itself is all the stronger for it, because its leadership is inherently built out of an amalgamation of shared ideals. But when that society becomes divisive, demanding changes to the core values which Scouting once clung to, Scouting itself does not have the internal structural integrity required to withstand the pressure - in other words, Scouting does not have the inherent authority to repulse outside influences forever. The Boy Scouts of America has held out far longer than most other world Scouting organizations (Scouting UK's recent push to make its Scouts "employable" reflects drastically a complete abandonment of Baden-Powell's purpose of building men of character and not material ambition). For over 100 years, the BSA still believed that boys needed a special place of their own, a place where their unique character, temperment, energy and zeal for life could find a safe, healthy outlet - a place where they could commune with each other, with nature, and with God. Now, its internal structure, which was originally designed to openly allow invested, caring adults to share a guiding hand in protecting that environment, has been hijacked and usupred by conspiring men and women determined to use the BSA and its proud heritage as a platform from which to push their own selfish and destructive societal agendas - and the young men of this country are their primary targets.  Now, it seems, they are winning greater and greater victories. Now girls are coming in, crowding out the safe space boys should have enjoyed by signing up for a program that wasn't designed for them, and which simply will not serve them like it serves boys. And so eventually changes will be made, and boys will slowly lose all the benefits that Scouting was meant to offer them. They will become marginalized in their own program. They will eventually be taught in Scouting that immoral behaviors should be tolerated, even celebrated. And soon this organization will no longer be the Boy Scouts of America. They will cling to that name for a while, till the advantages of that name are used up, and eventually it too is dropped. But already, that orginal program of over one hundred years, is almost gone. It may become a fun program, it may become an instructive program - but will not be the same program. That program, the Boy Scouts of America, the one founded by Baden-Powell, Beard, Seton, West, Hillcourt - that program does not exist anymore. The images you see in the Rockwell paintings, of boys in the woods and on the streets, in churches, communities, shelters, hospitals, backyards and living rooms, boys camping, fishing, serving, helping, caring - they are of an organization I believe will soon no longer exist. And so. Whereas before I felt that I was sad to leave,  I realize now that to say Scouting is losing me would be a falsehood. Not that losing one volunteer would make any difference, but that I - that our nation - we are losing Scouting. The quote above stated "Who the BSA admits is less important to me than the core mission of bringing Scouting to the youth in the program." And this is just the tragedy. Scouting will no longer be brought to them, because Scouting is not simply the activities, the achievements, the adventures. It is the boys themselves who for 108 years have been blessed and protected within this inspired program. And now they no longer have it; it belongs now not to them, but to outside powers making changes that the boys cannot control, and cannot stop; and being young, they do not realize fully what is being stolen from them, nor will they be given the power to rescue it themselves.  So yes, at the end of next year I will no longer be a part of Scouting. I will continue to deliver the program will all my heart, mind, and strength until then, within my unit, as the walls crash around me. But I will be sad (albeit not surprised) to find that I have stayed in my place, while Scouting has moved to a different world altogether. These decisions have not "overshadowed the core program." I believe they reject it entirely, but will inevitably use it only as long as it is useful to them. I only pray for the sake of the boys who remain that such will last for a small time longer at least. In many units with dedicated, inspired and visionary leaders, it may last much longer. I believe there will be many pockets of successful, true Scouting scattered all over the nation, and I look forward to hearing their stories of success against the waves of compelled change. But I will have other battles to fight then, and other programs to nurture, and other flocks to tend. I hope however that I and those brave units will be able to depend on each other for support and encouragement whenever we may we call upon each other. My prayer is that those future alliances will ever hold strong against whatever troubles may come.
    • Yeah, a lot of the information in this is outdated - is this really the latest edition? EDIT: The copyright date does indeed say 2015. If there is a new 2018 edition, the files at the link aren't it.
    • Thank, I'll order some and test them out.   Dale
    • I've gone through Wood Badge and served on staff a couple times.  I'm a Fox.  Which also happens to be my patrol animal.  But your right about "trickle down" respect and pride.  I took all the stuff in today and is being used tomorrow at a day camp.  I'm working the next 4 day camps so I know the tools will be taken care of.  I'll miss the next one but by then I'll have a manual together and a sign in/out procedure that will make a single person responsible for the tools. So if anything is missing that district would have to pay for it.  We'll see what happens. Dale   
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