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How do I explain this to a scout?

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  • #16
    All of these ideas are great. Exceptional scout spirit, really, is not looking for a great fanfare or a plaque. You just go up to a fella, shake his hand and say "Yo, you've demonstrated truly exceptional scout spirit." Say as much in front of the whole troop, and you've made your impact. Sure, you could set up a special SMC and BoR, but really that's so you have an impact on the troop adults. And, maybe this boy needs to reflect a little, so that would be one way of teaching him how to do it.

    Then, like Stosh says, you invite him to join you in servant leadership. A "Dr. Who" award is a great idea.

    Finally, there's no equality with this sort of thing. This boy gets it. You don't have to give it to another boy or even hint that it is available to another boy until the next one comes along who deserves it.

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    • #17
      Periochas, yes he really wanted the rank. His story is different than most. He didn't join scouts until 3 years ago. And he didn't wake up until fairly late in the process. He got First Class with 17 months to go. I've seen too many Eagles that got there because mom and dad were hovercraft and watched these details. This scout's parents didn't understand what was going on. So I know this scout wanted it. He wants the recognition. That has been a driving force and a good one to bring out his character. I agree with you that his character is worth more than a patch, but he won't see that for a long time.

      I don't have a problem using recognition to motivate a boy to develop his character. Adults have Silver Beavers, District Awards of Merit, and Position of the Year awards, so I'd like to let this scout know, and for a bunch of others to see, that character is important. If I were a scout and I compared the Eagle award and all the hoopla with it to a handshake from the SM, it would be very clear what has higher importance, yet this is backward to what I'd like it to be. Ideally, I'd just hold all scouts to the higher character bar, and maybe I might, but for the scout that just wants to do the right thing and is not interested in the patch, I'd like to recognize that so they find a reason to exercise their character.

      While I like Dr Who, the First Class emblem sounds much better to me. Giving him a sonic screw driver patch along with it would be fun, though.

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      • #18
        It's interesting to watch the discussion of this wonderful young man. We have many scouts (my older son included) who were so busy with scouting that they didn't do their EBOR untill a couple of weeks before their 18th birthday. What I find so interesting is most of those guys (my son included) could have cared less about an award. I agree this scout needs some recognition and I don't have an answer to the original question, but I would be careful that this recognition isn't more important for the adults than the scout. What ever you choose to do for this scout, you are setting a model for all the other scouts in the troop. So be careful what you are trying to say. Barry

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        • #19
          If that Eagle Scout would like a rank patch, I have one I can send him.

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          • #20
            If he's really that good ... give him yours. He'd treasure it far more that one bought for him ... and you can go to the Scout store and replace yours.

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            • #21
              Perhaps all Units should come up with an Aging out Ceremony..Honoring each Scout,s Journey through Scouting..
              I know the Saying is "Once an Eagle, Always an Eagle" but there is No Shame in Saying "Once a Scout, Always a Scout"..Scouters should continue to Live by the Scout Oath and Law For the Rest of their Lives. Why Stop after you age out...Continue to do a Good Deed Daily.

              BSA Should do more to retain Scouters past 18...for Life.

              I know Traditionally It has been "unOffical" and basically expected for Scouters to Age out..Leave Scouting...Get Married, have Kids and Then Return to Scouting..and Stay till they Age out and repeat the Process.I fell into this unspoken Cycle...I returned when My last Girlfriend's son started Tiger Cubs..Looking Back I feel I let the program down because I could have contributed over those 30 somethings years I missed out on. I wanted to return to Scouting but like Most, I used the excuse "I don't have Kids in Scouting to stay away." I felt people would look down on me and think I was Weird being around Kids without Kids of "My Own."

              I will say there is one Regret in My Life...Missing all those years in Scouting. All the Missed chances to help Youth enjoy life..Missed Camping Trips, Missed Camp Fires, Missed Summer Camps...Missed Chances to positively influence Youth in a Good way.

              We should be trying to retain Scouters for Life..Not till they age out

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              • #22
                When my boy quit scouting at the Star rank, he was totally surprised to find out that I kept on going. I took a hiatus for a while when my schedule prohibited it (college, ministry), but when I got back in, I stayed. 40+ years as a registered scout/scouter. My son was for only 8 years a part of that tenure, 5 in Cubs and 3 in Scouts.

                I've been an outdoors person my whole life, long before scouting and long after. Scouting just made it nicer to share with others.

                And who many Scouters out there can stay they were instrumental in starting 44 new units? I'm working on #44 now.

                Stosh

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                • #23
                  On the GSUSA side over half of our troop never "aged out" we just kept right on going. Many of us went into training and/or being leadership for other groups of girls who didn't have leadership available to them.

                  I foresee the same for my boys. I pray that when they reach 18 they have an idea of how they want to begin working on their future in Scouting. Some of my happiest memories were continuing to work with Scouting in the years between "aging out" and finally having a child old enough to join Cub Scouts.

                  We used to joke that Scouting was like "Hotel California". "You can check out any time you like...but you can never leave."

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                  • #24
                    I have seen SMs make kids like that JASMs and then ASMs if they turn 18 before they graduate. That might mean more to him than anything. Also, I hear H. Ross Perot is sympathetic to such plights. A kind note to him might get a letter in return for your Scout.

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                    • #25
                      When I was a Scout, a good friend could not pass Life Saving due to a leg in a brace (polio) and so could not earn Eagle. Many more than 21 MB's. Went on every hike.

                      The SM and SPL got together, The SM then bought a new brass eagle for the top of out U.S. colors. In a suitable ceremony at Court of Honor, the SPL presented that Eagle from the top of the flag pole to the Scout as "Our Finest Eagle."

                      I know from conversations, that he treasures that eagle as much as anyone could treasure one of silver on a ribbon as it represented the love and respect of the Scouts of the Troop and the Scoutmaster who all knew his value as a Scout and a person. (No. There was not a dry eye in the house.)

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