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  • epaulette

    I saw there are a few forums that talk about the epaulettes. I was told there is no real regulation covering this by a district advancement chair who presented a troop with homemade camouflage ones. Now, I know camouflage is not to be used in scouts, so I am questioning the answer she gave me .....

    This is what I think MAYBE true ~ 1. Scouts are red or the new green (Jambo has it's own)
    2. Different levels have a color ~ districts, councils ETC.

    So, my question is ~ Are there any regulations concerning what a scout can where? Are they allowed to wear homemade ones?


  • #2
    The camo rule must be a myth. There are national scout shops selling camo t-shirts with the boy scout logo on them.

    Blue = cub scouts
    Pine Green = Boy Scouts
    Red = Retired color of the boy scouts - no longer to be used
    Bright green = Venturing
    Silver = district/council
    Yellow = Regional/National

    All retired uniform parts are still valid for use on the uniform. So red loops are fine on Boy Scouts. Old hats, shirts, patches, etc are all still valid.

    There are no consequences for getting creative with your uniform. The insignia guide is there for you to reference if you would like your uniforms to be correct.

    There is nothing you can do about a volunteer who will not obey the insignia guide. Camo loops are definitely not on the list of approved uniform wear, but there's no one who can make them stop it.

    You are empowered to tell them you think it is a silly thing to do. You may also ask nicely that they wear the proper loops. That's really as far as you can go with uniform rules.

    Oh well.



    Comment


    • #3
      You would think that an advancement chair would have at least a rudimentary understanding of the uniform. The colors are as regulated as any other part of the uniform.

      With that said I've seen troops create their own, like neckerchiefs, but it is incorrect. Like wearing jeans with a scout shirt.

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      • #4
        Epaulettes are and have always been the same color as the shirt in the BSA - tan/khaki being the current color for Boy Scouts.

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        • #5
          That is true only if one knows what an epaulet really is.

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          • #6
            No, it is still true if one is uneducated. Not being aware does not make it false.

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            • #7
              I've seen NYLT courses assign each patrol a separate color and issue colored loops that scouts continue to wear years after the course.

              I've also seen scouters make holiday themed loops as part of a Roundtable program.

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              • #8
                Not sure if you meant to imply that neckers are restricted to BSA neckers, they are not. I think you meant that neckers are allowed to be troop chosen and epaulettes are not, which is correct.

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                • #9
                  I've also seen camp staffs create their own.

                  Don't like any of it to be honest. I like sticking with the established colors.

                  As for the holiday theme ones, with no disrespect to my fellow Cub Scout leaders, but I'm betting it was the CS RT Commissioner doing it. They teach doing crazy stuff like that for CS RT Commissioners.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Food for thought...

                    http://www.scoutinsignia.com/camo.htm

                    http://www.scoutingmagazine.org/issues/0510/d-lett.html

                    http://scouting.org/filestore/council368/Camping/WhatToBringToCampPersonalGear.pdf

                    http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/Media/InsigniaGuide/02.aspx

                    "Clause 4. Prohibition of Alteration or Imitation.
                    No alteration of, or additions to, the official uniforms, as described in the official publications, or the rules and regulations covering the wearing of the uniform and the proper combinations thereof on official occasions, may be authorized by any Scouting official or local council or any local executive board or committee, except the Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of America after consideration by the Program Group Committee.

                    Imitation of United States Army, Navy, or Marine Corps uniforms is prohibited, in accordance with the provisions of the organization's Congressional Charter."

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                    • #11
                      So, the epaulette is the strip of cloth on the shoulder that buttons down. The ribbon is the thing that ha color. Although technically the strip of cloth has color as well as its not invisible...

                      At the Denver airport comming back from Philmont the airport was full of scouts. One group had orange ribbons on and were wearing CSP from New Jersey so I told one youth "You are the first varsity scouts I have ever met east of the Mississippi" he said "Huh?", I said you are wearing the orange ribbons of Varsity and he said, no, our troop has an High Adventure patrol and we wear the orange ribbon to be different. So, I said, oh like a Venture Patrol and he got an irritated look in his eye and said, No, we are a High Adventure patrol. Never heard of a Venture Patrol

                      Can we just dump the uniform and move on?

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                      • #12
                        I guess I am a cafeteria uniformer. I am flexible on the pants --My boys are using non-BSA green tactical pants but they LOOK like the uniform--but the epaulette ribbons need to be the same color. Folks get confused enough as it is.

                        So I think the guy was wrong. He (and the Adventure) patrol should have made up unique neckers, temp patch, or Patrol patch. Plenty to work with there.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for the info.......

                          Everyone's input helped a lot. If I understood correctly ~ yes there are guidelines and regulations, but many troops and groups are straying!!

                          I asked because we have a very deserving scout in our troop. He needs to be recognized, but he would feel uncomfortable wearing a kerchief that is different from everyone else (too noticeable) I thought the epaulette would be more discrete, yet I know he would be proud to wear them.

                          He has participated in multiple trainings, but wants to keep his World Conservation patch on his right pocket because a number of scouts in our troop have also earned it. If scouts had knots for training, like the adult's have, this would be great. They are small and have a place to be worn.

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                          • #14
                            Interestingly, according to Wikipedia (not the ultimate authority, to be sure) the ribbon would be the epaulette and the shoulder strap that holds the decoration is a 'passant.' It also says that commonly the shoulder strap is called an epaulette, especially if it itself is decorated. So I think the term can apply to either the shoulder strap or the ribbons.

                            I also think the rules about scout uniforms not imitating military uniforms is splitting hairs, since the reference is clear. We certainly don't walk around looking like tennis players or ballerinas, except for Scoutfish.

                            Here's an idea! Those who support an open BSA membership policy in regards to sexual orientation can wear rainbow striped epaulettes.

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                            • #15
                              "Clause 4. Prohibition of Alteration or Imitation.
                              No alteration of, or additions to, the official uniforms, as described in the official publications, or the rules and regulations covering the wearing of the uniform and the proper combinations thereof on official occasions, may be authorized by any Scouting official or local council or any local executive board or committee, except the Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of America after consideration by the Program Group Committee.

                              Imitation of United States Army, Navy, or Marine Corps uniforms is prohibited, in accordance with the provisions of the organization's Congressional Charter."


                              .....

                              These by-laws are designed to keep the franchiser, BSA national, in control of official uniform elements and design and deny local council corporations the ability to go their own way while chartered by BSA.

                              This rule does not apply to scout volunteers in the field.

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