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sewing patches on pockets

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  • #31
    By the time I stitch-ripped off the pocket I could have the new patch on.

    Yes, over the years I stitched pockets shut, as well as sleeves. My solution was a piece of plexiglass cut to the size of the pocket. Slip that into the pocket before sewing, hold patch in the right position, pin away, one can't poke all the way through and then start sewing. The plexiglass makes a nice hard working surface and there is no way a stitch can go through and pick up more than the outside layer of cloth. Another piece a bit bigger works well on the sleeve.

    For those who think I'm a sewing whiz, think again. I have sewn not only my pockets shut as well as my sleeves, but I have also sewn the whole thing to my pants as well. The plexiglass has solved all of those problems for me.

    Stosh

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    • #32
      I sew pockets closed. If they want useable pockets they are more than welcome to sew themselves. I am a huge fan of elmers school glue stick. Glue the patch where it is supposed to be, let is sit for 30 minutes or so, and sew on using thread in the bobbin that matches the shirt and medium weight nylon thread on the top. Sashes are done the same way, badge is glued on, then stitch 2 rows all the way across all 3 patches in the row. I will admit that when hubby held multiple positions (committee chair, unit commissioner and whatever else) I used velcro so we wouldnt need quite so many shirts.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by jblake47 View Post
        .... My solution was a piece of plexiglass cut to the size of the pocket. Slip that into the pocket before sewing, hold patch in the right position, pin away, one can't poke all the way through and then start sewing. The plexiglass makes a nice hard working surface and there is no way a stitch can go through and pick up more than the outside layer of cloth. Another piece a bit bigger works well on the sleeve.
        ... The plexiglass has solved all of those problems for me.
        Epiphany: Now I understand why those two signal mirrors were in my brother's old sewing kit!
        Thanks Stosh!

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        • #34
          Originally posted by qwazse View Post

          Epiphany: Now I understand why those two signal mirrors were in my brother's old sewing kit!
          Thanks Stosh!
          Funny you should mention that. I don't carry my plexiglass while camping, but I did use my signal mirror last week to put my camp patch on my shirt pocket.

          Stosh

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          • #35
            There are three options:

            1. Sew it on by hand
            2. Sew the pocket shut
            3. Remove the pocket, sew on the patch, sew the pocket back on.


            The answer to your question is: I'm an adult member, I don't earn ranks, so I don't sew them on. The correct question should be "how can my scout sew a rank patch on a shirt without sewing the pocket shut?"

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            • #36
              Hey OX, better corral that bull!
              Originally posted by Old_OX_Eagle83 View Post
              ... The answer to your question is: I'm an adult member, I don't earn ranks, so I don't sew them on. The correct question should be "how can my scout sew a rank patch on a shirt without sewing the pocket shut?"
              If you're lacking a patch for that right pocket, PM me your snail mail. I'll send you one so you could have a pocket of your own to sew shut!

              Pockets are only the start of my woes. If I could sew it wrong, I think I've done it: fronts to backs, sleeves to armpits, I think once I might have even snagged a collar.

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              • #37
                Qwqzse,

                I appreciate the offer, but I have no shortage of patches for my right pocket, but rarely sew them on. I typically cut small pony tail holders in half and sew them to the top edge of temps, so I can change patches when I feel like it.

                Typically I either wear the temp from my most recent event, or choose something to spark scout interest in a location or activity. Of late I've been wearing my Kodiak Staff patch, as we just wrapped op a course, and I want to promote the program.

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                • #38
                  This is an old topic but since I haven't read how our family does it I thought I'd throw it out there. In the late 90's I would hand stitch my patches and I didn't like it. When I was 15 or so I went to a yard sale and found this handheld sewing machine like new for 10 bucks. It looked like a large stapler and I could stitch a patch on clean in about a minute no problem. No sewing pockets closed or anything. Now I have seen those machines on infomercials so I know they are still out there available. I might even have one hidden in the deepest darkest corners of a closet somewhere. So that is one idea no one has mentioned yet. Here is a link to one at Penneys I found in a quick search. Looks like most are under $20 but some get spendy. http://www.jcpenney.com/for-the-home/storage-or

                  What we do now however is a bit if a cheat for sure, but came into use out of necessity. We now use a tool called a Buttoneer. $10 at Walmart. It is supposed to be used to stitch buttons on in an emergency. It's basically a plastic staple that a palm sized machine pushes through the patch and pocket. We started using it in cubs when the boys would rough house and a patch would get fully or partially ripped off. We didn't want angry mom's calling us later that night, again, so we would put a few of the stitches in and remind the boy to tell his mom. He either forgot or the moms figured we had fixed it well enough. That scenario moved to some of the boys wanting their ranks on their shirts as soon as they were awarded them. So click click and it was done. Refills can be a pain to get but it packs the size of a sewing kit and has been very handy at camps when secondhand clothing needed hemmed and other situations. http://www.walmart.com/msharbor/ip/1...0&veh=mweb:sem
                  Last edited by Longhaired_Mac; 08-04-2014, 04:20 AM.

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                  • #39
                    After looking at the posts on this thread, I am not happy with most of the solutions. I believe that except for temporary patches that can be hung from a pocket flap, all other patches should be properly sewn on. All pockets should be functional. Patches need to be replaceable. If you can find a very small curved needle, it would help considerably. Do not throw away replaced patches, save them for your boy or girl.

                    1. Slip something in pockets so you don't sew through to the uniform underneath.
                    2. Pin the patch in place and measure for accurate placement.
                    3. The stitching I most often use is to start the stitch on the backside of the fabric of the pocket material with the needle coming up on the edge of the patch border stitching, then the needle goes down and picks up the pocket fabric directly across from where the thread comes out of the border, the needle is directed back and up through the patch border again maybe an eighth of an inch further along, keep repeating all the way around the patch, finish off threads by three short wraps through the backside of the material. (The effect is that all stitching runs in the same direction of the edge stitching of the patch).

                    Make sure that your finishing thread does not need to be made in the bottom of the pocket since you can not reach that far down in the pocket to retrieve the needle.

                    There is a problem that I do have problems with, and this is with segment patches around the council patch. They are too small to pin in place accurately. If you are slightly off or sloppy in positioning them, the last patch will not fit and you will have to start all over again. A very fine curved needle is a necessity to handle these. I have a suggestion below. It is too bad someone does not make a kit for this.

                    1. Determine the diameter needed to handle your council patch with the ring segment patches around it and cut a piece of fabric that you will sew your council patch and segment patches onto.
                    3. Machine stitch the edge of the fabric to prevent it from unraveling.
                    2. Use a temporary fabric adhesive to position and lay down the patches on the cut fabric.
                    3. Sew the patches to the fabric by only going through the borders with matching color thread, using a stitch the goes completely from patch side to backside of the fabric, not edge-wrapping as discussed above.
                    4. When the patches are sewn on, then the cut fabric with patches can be centered on the pocket and sewn in place as one large patch, using the edge-wrapping method first discussed. A few stitches in the interior area will also give it some stability.

                    You need to remember that patches will not do well with laundering. You should hand wash shirts in a sink. Do not use harsh detergents.

                    I could use help with two items here.

                    1. If you are a pro and know where to find small curved needles for this kind of work please recommend a source.

                    2. If you are familiar with a temporary glue that easily washes out please recommend it here also. It is possible to make your own cornstarch glue but I have not tried it to make sure it is suitable.

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                    • #40
                      When I was younger, I would have to do it myself, but now that I'm an adult with a little disposable income, I tend to pay a seamstress to do most of the patches for me, particularly the permanent ones. Only costs me $2 a patch. CSP, numerals (3-4), position, trained, World Organization of the Scout crest and I'm done. Everything under $20 and well placed.

                      Of course, when you're older, I believe you're allowed to cheat a little bit.

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                      • #41
                        My mom could sew and I suppose she did teach me, I don't remember, but I do remember sewing on my Cub Scout patches. Those little arrow points were really a bear to get on right. I had a discussion just last night as to why one of the boys didn't have his patches on yet. He told me his mother hadn't found the time yet. She's been having health problems. But then I reminded him, it's not her responsibility, it's his...... It totally amazes me how unable people today are when it comes to taking care of themselves. Whatever happened to be prepared?

                        Stosh

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