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Tools for Youth Leadership Training

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  • #16
    Eagle92, I would gladly pay for a copy of the dvd/cd of the Brownsea Syllabus

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    • #17
      Dry doesn't even begin to describe the training, and it's even worse when you consider it should be done twice a year!

      One of the things I found helps is using a small group of senior scouts, possibly your NYLT trained scouts, as "comic relief with a purpose". At the beginning of every module have them do a short skit which is a group of scout leaders doing exactly the wrong thing in comic ways. Add in a few spontaneous run-ons to drive key points home.

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      • #18
        I, too, would like to create a version of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops that isn't quite as dry and doesn't lend itself to much to sitting around inside.

        @Eagle92, is there a way you could send out a copy of the Brownsea syllabus?

        LeCastor

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        • #19
          Folks,

          Sorry for the delay in response, it's been very hectic. I will work on it this week.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by LeCastor View Post
            I, too, would like to create a version of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops that isn't quite as dry and doesn't lend itself to much to sitting around inside.

            LeCastor
            The course has changed in the last 20 years, but we modified our versions over the years to fit our needs. Experts say that you will be lucky if this age group gets 20% of what you are throwing at them. A lot of adults take that to mean giving out 200% hoping they get enough. We took that to mean take out that 80% of the course we absolutely don’t need and work the program so scouts instead learn that 80% by observing role models.

            We also split the course into two courses. Our true skill introduction course was an overnight once a year course while the part that reviews POR responsibilities and expectations was presented after each election and only lasted an hour. Scouts hate repeating training courses, so we split it up so scouts would only get the parts they have never seen before. Also, our courses are usually followed with lock-ins so the scouts can play games all night long. The PLC considers that one of the benefits of being on the PLC.

            Observe and ask your scouts what part of the course they like and don’t like and figure out how to make the parts they don’t like different and better. Or don’t do those parts at all. Professionals in psychological development say that we humans learn 90% of our behavior by observing others. Observing in my book doesn’t include listening. Some training is important for behavior development, but also develop your program so that scouts get most of their education by observing other scouts during in the normal troop environment. Get them out in the woods and human nature will take care of most of what you are trying to get.

            Barry

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            • #21
              What about taking the PL on a camp out led by the SPL. The SM gives the SPL a list of discussion topics (What do you think your role involves? What does servant leadership mean? What did last years leaders in your position do well?, etc. ) and a list of exercises and activities (gather wood for a fire without using any saws, build a fire wih a single match, cook dinner without using a stove, teach a skill that all scouts should know but that isn't a requirement, etc.). The adults join in the discussion topics after the scouts have talked it through to confirm they are on the right track or to add some thoughts. The scouts critique themselves (start, stop, continue) how on how they did on each exercise with the adults chiming in at the end of the discussion. Add a brainstorming session about meetings and outings and your done.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Hedgehog View Post
                What about taking the PL on a camp out led by the SPL. .
                Have you experienced this style of leadership training Hedgehog? I would be interested in hearing about the scouts experiences from it.

                Barry

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                • #23
                  Barry: When I did SM / ASM outdoor skills training, we were split into patrols and spent the weekend camping and functioning as a patrol. The PowerPoint part of the training was boring, putting the concepts into action as part of a patrol was interesting. When I did WFA training, we were split into groups for the exercises rotating the different roles. My idea takes those experiences and applies BSA principles and methods. 1) Scouting is Outing so be outdoors; 2) Boy Led means that the boys take the lead in the discussion with coaching before hand from the adults; 3) Scouts learn from doing, so there should be a lot of doing; 4) scouting is a game played outdoors - so incorporate games and interesting exercises that keep attention and emphasize points. I haven't done this with scouts... yet. I'm really thinking out loud because our troop is looking to do training differently this year.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Hedgehog View Post
                    I haven't done this with scouts... yet. I'm really thinking out loud because our troop is looking to do training differently this year.
                    Well I so have some experience in this area and I had the reputation around here of being the master of doing something different, so I feel I can toss out a few things to help you along.

                    First, don’t expect the scouts to jump on this because it is outdoors. Scouts do lots of outdoor stuff, so it is not an incentive. Adults are different that they are looking to learn from the experience, so they jump at it with both feet. Scouts on the other hand are into adventure and trust me when leadership development is thrown in the mix, they don’t see the adults vision. Adding more outdoors for the sake of “development, training, learning, growing” or anything like doesn’t come off as fun for scouts. What attracts scouts is “new” and “different” adventure.

                    In my mind National has lost sight of how their program gets to their vision of developing men of character. But our troop even looks at High Adventure Treks as development experiences. How many discussion have you seen on this forum are specific to insuring scout growth on a Philmont trek?

                    My point is be different, first create a great adventure, THEN work the growth of leadership development into the program. Here some ideas, drop off the patrol at one end of a camp in the dark and tell them they have to pack their gear and hike 4 miles to the other end of camp, by following a map, by a designated time where the adults will have hot supper ready and waiting the next day. The teamwork required to just set up and break camp is a big challenge for scouts, much less doing it in a timely manner. Then you can add lesson session (FUN lesson sessions) on stops along the way. Or you could add canoeing and biking as part of the trek. Our troop did a similar troop campout at our scout camp where we had access to canoes. Another way of doing this is have the patrol campout Friday night at your troop meeting location then break camp the next morning to back pack through town to another location. I planned something like that for a camporee. District didn’t use it.

                    But you see the point, different is good if it is adventure. The hard part about this is that the adults have a vision of growth and the scouts have a vision of adventure. IT NEVER GOES THE WAY THE ADULTS EXPECT. And, you really need to understand the lessons or growth that you want the scouts to gain from the experience. There is nothing like an adult or SPL babbling away on some leadership thing that makes little sense because they really don’t know what they are talking about. Keep the lessons simple so that the scout get-it. You can talk about the four styles of leadership or the four steps to team building for hours, but trust me in that is the 80% of the yakking the scouts don’t take home. The point you want the boys to take away with them should be said in one sentence.

                    I agree fully with you that the experience in the activity should guide them into the growth you want them to gain. I have found that time to be the best teacher, not the activity. I wish I could get adults to understand that agendas are the adults best friend. Imagine and agenda where the scouts have to get up, break camp, hike two to four miles for lunch at 11:00 am. Lunch will be gone by 11:10 am, so the scouts have to be on time. And before lunch, there will be two adventure rest stops where the scouts will be challenged with their skills. The adventure stops are your opportunities to teach. But they should also have some kind of reward for the scout. It can be anything. The agenda also had dinner at 5:00 but the scouts must have their camp set up for inspection before they can eat. All time between inspection and dinner is free time at the lake to fish, swim, canoe or whatever.

                    See how time drives scouts toward an objective. Each objective has an incentive because incentives are adventure for the scouts. It’s not about that boring growth stuff to them, it’s about getting to the fun stuff. I remember our Philmont group had a busy day the next day and one of the stops was fly fishing. We adults didn’t have to say a thing for them to realize that if they wanted some time for the fun fly fishing, we needed to be on the trail by 5:30am in the dark. So they planned out the night before how they we going to do that, and we did. They worked as a team for that one incentive and they functioned better as a team the rest of the trek. I couldn’t have predicted that, time did it for me.

                    To have a successful experience like you want, make it the weekend an adventure for the scouts and make the lesson leaders understand their subject. Your guys will go home ready to make your troop the best troop in the district. And this years participants will be next years program planners and leaders. It is just so cool. And when the other troops here about this, they will want to participate as well. I've seen happen.

                    I love this scouting stuff.

                    Barry

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                    • #25
                      Interesting history of Brownsea Double-two on" pinetree web.com". It does list the agenda for the week. Find the search box and enter "Brownsea", or find the index and down at the bottom of it is the link to the Brownsea training history. The link at the bottom of the article "Learning About Leadership" was worth a refresher

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                      • #26
                        Folks,

                        I hate to say it, but I need more time. As some may have noticed, I'm not posting as much as I use to, and that's because I don't have the time I use. Please be patient with me, I will post the syllabus.

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                        • #27
                          Folks,

                          I have not tired uploading the document here yet, But I did upload the document to the Scouter Dot Com Facebook Group page found here:

                          https://www.facebook.com/groups/172739770499/

                          Will try and post here.

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                          • #28
                            Ok Still exceeds this website's limit. At least it's on Facebook now.

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