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  • Old tents

    Back in the early '70s, bsa had a tent that looked like an pyramid, about 8x8 and 7 high. Might have called the miner. It was great for camping in snow or high winds. My troop had just one that was always reserved for the spl. Call me senile but I miss the smell of canvas it just doesn't feel like camping without it. I have been trying to find some one who still makes 'em or could send me a pattern to make my own. But no luck so far. Anyone know of a source? a lot of the scouts think retro is cool and come to meeting with their Dad's uniforms on (no red berets yet) I think they would get a kick seeing the old tents
    Oldscout

  • #2
    Still use canvas, nothing old about it!

    Stosh

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    • #3
      No help on the original question. But on the canvas v nylon debate it depends what we're doing this side of the pond. For summer camps we mostly use canvas patrol tents. If you've not seen them your side of the pond they are very common over here. Typically green canvas, ridge pole and two uprights, normally wooden. They come in different sizes but we reckon on being able to fit 6 cubs or 4/5 scouts in one depending on size. They are built like tanks and almost indestructable. We retired one last year that was getting a bit battered that we reckon is 40+ years old. They look like this http://www.blacksofgreenock.co.uk/ac...tormhaven.html Problem is they are heavy and take quite a while to put up hence normally only used for longer camps. Our cub leader are particular fans because cubs either never bring a watch to camp or don't bother to look at it. So if it's light they get out of bed! Even if it's late June and it's light at 4.30am.... canvas tents are darker so the cubs sleep longer. For weekend camps we'd go for modern nylon tents as they are so much quicker to put up and can of course be carried in a rucksack. Alas though their life expectancy is a lot shorter.

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      • #4
        ????? What happened to the posting about the Miner Tent???? I came back here to referernce it and it's GONE!! It mentioned an american company that makes canvas historically accurate tents, what happened to that entry?
        I like the brit company (excuse me, Scottish company) and their products, but What Happened To the Other Entry????

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        • King Ding Dong
          King Ding Dong commented
          Editing a comment
          I say blame it on Pack. He doth protest to much on these matters.

      • #5
        My boyhood troop have miner tents, and baker tents. We used to set them up together with a miner in the middle on a longer center pole for a circus tent effect.

        Buy a miner tent here http://beckelcanvas.com/products_vie...products_id=41

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        • #6
          funny.... I've been researching going in the opposite direction. Thinking of getting one of those ultralight tents for myself.
          I was talking with our troop's ASM the other week, and I mentioned that I like the idea of the boys kitting up as if they are backpacking for every camping trip..... Still bring the trailer and the troop kitchen for many camps, and other stuff maybe for weeklong camps, but going lightweight and minimal a lot would serve as good practice I think.....

          I do have fond memories of that old canvas though.....

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          • #7
            We used baker tents. Anyone know why they were called that?
            Today we don't use canvas. It is heavy and a major aspect I remember from the baker tents was: mosquito bites. I think that today's tent materials and designs are a great improvement. No nostalgia here, at least not for those old tents.

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            • #8
              Originally posted by packsaddle View Post
              We used baker tents. Anyone know why they were called that?
              Today we don't use canvas. It is heavy and a major aspect I remember from the baker tents was: mosquito bites. I think that today's tent materials and designs are a great improvement. No nostalgia here, at least not for those old tents.
              Mosquito netting is great even without a tent. Not only that, it's lighter than a nylon tent and can compress down to quite a small package, about the size of a water bottle.

              A poncho, netting and turned over canoe make quite a nice sleeping arrangement.

              Stosh

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              • #9

                Originally posted by jblake47 View Post

                Mosquito netting is great even without a tent. Not only that, it's lighter than a nylon tent and can compress down to quite a small package, about the size of a water bottle.

                A poncho, netting and turned over canoe make quite a nice sleeping arrangement.

                Stosh

                +1 on the bites.... and that old canvas was hot too!

                Interesting point on the netting and poncho.....
                If it weren't for the lack of privacy for changing clothes, etc..... netting + a tarp shelter (Kelty Noah's tarp or similar) might make for a nice lightweight set-up.

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                • #10
                  Privacy? What's what a sleeping bag is for! One can also rig the poncho to drop corners to form a pup-tent configuration and have all the privacy one wants and also cuts down on the weather coming in as well. One learns to rig ponchos rather quickly when the need arises. I like the poncho vs. tarp any day because I rarely need to sleep in my poncho.

                  Stosh

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                  • #11
                    Privacy ? I spent to many years in a Y locker room. Don't want to see my ugly ass, close your eyes.

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                    • #12
                      Originally posted by packsaddle View Post
                      We used baker tents. Anyone know why they were called that?
                      Today we don't use canvas. It is heavy and a major aspect I remember from the baker tents was: mosquito bites. I think that today's tent materials and designs are a great improvement. No nostalgia here, at least not for those old tents.

                      They resembles a Yankee baker, or reflective oven.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by blw2 View Post
                        +1 on the bites.... and that old canvas was hot too!
                        Interesting point on the netting and poncho.....
                        If it weren't for the lack of privacy for changing clothes, etc..... netting + a tarp shelter (Kelty Noah's tarp or similar) might make for a nice lightweight set-up.
                        You can change clothes in a poncho (trick I read about from a woman who is a rafting guide). I hammock with a 12x12 tarp (same size as a Noah's 12), and it provides plenty of coverage for changing.

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                        • #14
                          Originally posted by perdidochas View Post

                          You can change clothes in a poncho (trick I read about from a woman who is a rafting guide). I hammock with a 12x12 tarp (same size as a Noah's 12), and it provides plenty of coverage for changing.

                          Whatever happened to changing in a sleeping bag, or under a blanket?

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                          • #15
                            sheesh people!...... yeah, I can change clothes under a bath towel if I want....... but I don't want..... especially with a bunch of boys running around!

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