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Parental involvement & Scouting . . . .

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  • Parental involvement & Scouting . . . .

    I have a co-worker whose son just crossed over into Boy Scouts. The boy didn't go into the troop associated with his pack but went to another troop. Dad recently was telling me about the new troop.

    "Parental involvement! Boy do they have the parents involved. They make sure that everyone gets their merit badges done. They make sure that everyone advances on time. That other troop was so disorganized. They let the boys plan events. Nobody is pushing them to advance."

    I know the Scoutmaster from his new troop. The fellow is the classic, "this is my troop and this is how it is going to work" type of guy. He fired the SPL in the middle of a campout a couple years back.

    Another thread had a question about a rope to show how little time we have with our kids. So? Boy Scouts isn't about spending time with your kids, it's about letting your kids grow in a good environment.


  • #2
    The situation you describe has nothing to do with the role of parents but is a matter of poor adult leadership. the Scoutmaster, and the other adults, do not understand the Scouting program. it has nothing to do with whether or not they are parents.

    I understand that you "feel" the Scouting program is what you say it is, however the BSA seems to see it differently. They say that their program is about teaching young people to make ethical decisions throughout their lifetime based on the values of the Scout Oath and law.

    Parental involvement is not going to hinder that as long as everyone is trained and understands the methods of the program they are in.

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    • #3
      This sounds more like 3rd year WEBELOS than Boy Scouts!

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      • #4
        I would be so kicked out of that troop! And so would my son! He doesn't like it when the adults simply inquire what the patrol is cooking for breakfast. What's this "organized" troop's retention rate, I wonder.

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        • #5
          I left a troop like this one to become SM of a boy-led, patrol-method troop.

          One would be surprised at the retention rate of a troop like that. If the SM likes you, you will Eagle, if not, you might as well quit. With that being said I would think the membership should hover around 25-35 depending on how many adults are in there pushing their boys.

          There are a lot of success oriented parents who really love a program like this and this is why they stay in business. Their boy succeeds no matter what and for many parents, that's all they are interested in.

          Has the SM gotten his Silver Beaver yet? With a hot-shot program like that, I'd be surprised if he hasn't.... :^)

          Stosh

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          • #6
            Gold Winger,
            The rope representing how much time we have to spend with an influnce our kids lives was about recruiting adults for Cub Scouts.
            My time will be done after he moves on up. Even at his level we are working on stepping up and leadership.
            I'd love to send that group of 7 -8 year olds out on a hike led by a 10 year old but BSA says I'm not allowed.
            Gotta have a few adults for them to fight with along their way.
            these adults in BOY SCOUTS are doing themselves and the boys a disservice. Show them how and let them do it. Cut those apron strings.

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            • #7
              Adults in Boy Scouts do not do a diservice. Adults who do not know, or no not follow the BSA program do the scouts a disservice.

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              • #8
                A little less than a year ago, my Webelos II kid was contemplating which of four troops in town to join...one was a hard-charging high adventure type, one was a laid-back ordinary "troop method" program, one was a small "family camping" sort (parents and siblings go on most trips) and one was a Webelos III type of troop.

                I visited another troop in an adjacent town, where the SM (who was letting his SPL and PLs run the meeting) talked with us parents, feeding us lines like "in Cub Scouts they're boys, but in Boy Scouts they're adolescents learning skills for adulthood" and "we ask that for the first year parents stay home and let us work with their sons".

                Unfortunately, my son didn't want to drive to the adjacent town (and they met on an evening where I have a regular commitment). He chose the laid-back troop method program, where he happened to know one older kid. Three months later, of course, he knows everybody (and at least they are trying to become more patrol method).

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                • #9
                  Whether the scout makes the decision or the parents, there are situations were the boy-led, patrol-method appeals to some and the adult-led, troop-method appeals to others.

                  Is it a disservice? I don't know. When the one adult-led troop travels half-way across the country for summer camp, does Sea Base every 4 years, Philmont every other, Boundary waters thrown in, and every activity along the way and then there's the troop trying to establish themselves as a boy-led, patrol-method and it looks like a lot of hard work, well.... the decision is easy for some.

                  Stosh

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                  • #10
                    Thank you BeeDub, you said exactly what I expected you to say.

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                    • #11
                      What a coincidence GW, I was thinking the same thing about your post.

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                      • #12
                        BeeDub, I seriously doubt that because BSA is mum on the subject.

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