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Question about Scout uniform and political advertising

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  • #16
    Originally posted by qwazse View Post
    So, the public doesn't have a right to know that he is proud of his families involvement in scouting?
    Of course they do, and no one is saying he can't tell people about his Scouting involvement. But wearing his uniform in campaign materials is not right.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by qwazse View Post
      So, the public doesn't have a right to know that he is proud of his families involvement in scouting?

      Not if you are using it in advertising to get votes. It implies an endorsement.

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      • #18
        Implications are meaningless in the world of politics. Running for office implies honesty, commitment, etc. and we all know that ain't ever gonna happen. If the candidate says they are church goers, does that imply that all Jews and Muslims shouldn't vote for him because it endorses Christianity? Saying he's a scout leader and showing a picture of him in that role is pretty much the same thing.

        Stosh

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        • #19
          I know this is an older topic, but I was reading this old article on Bryan's blog. Seems to say pretty clearly that it's not allowed.

          Q: Can Scouts and Scouters pose for photos with political candidates at these events?
          A: Yes. But photos of candidates or Scouts in uniform or BSA marks and logos are not allowed in political campaign materials of any kind.


          The Boy Scouts of America might be the most patriotic organization in the U.S. But don’t take that to mean we endorse any one political party. The same applies to your pack, troop, team, or crew. You and your Scouts should Do Your Duty to Country but not by endorsing any one candidate. During election years, though, the line between patriotism and political favoritism becomes thin, making it important to remind you of the BSA’s official policy on Scout participation in political rallies. Here are some Frequently Asked Questions and the BSA’s official answers: Q: Could a pack, troop, team, or crew provide a color guard flag ceremony for a candidate’s public speaking event or rally? A: Yes. But, BSA Policy requires our adult and youth members in uniform to leave immediately after the presentation of colors and the Pledge of Allegiance. Should they want to stay they must do so as individuals, not Scouting represenatives, meaning, they would have to change out of their uniforms. Q: So Scouts and Scouters can’t stand on the platform for the remainder of the speech or presentation? A: No, they should not remain on the speakers’ platform or in a conspicuous location where media could construe their presence [...]

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