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  • #16
    Either drive or pay some other parent to drive their kid there. This should be factored into the cost of every activity.

    For many years I was SM and only had one ASM. The two of us handled everything for a 25 boy troop. Registration, food and gas was factored into every event. Parents who didn't want or couldn't afford the gas could drive and it wouldn't cost them anything as long as the car was full of kids and gear.

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    • #17
      If it has gotten really terrible, and you try some of the approaches already mentioned, then you could try informing the parents that beginning on X date scouts whose parents haven't helped out with driving once in the past X months won't be able to camp.
      At least for you it's parents. All of a sudden the ASMs in my troop have adopted an attitude of "well my scout isn't going so I'm not going." Try getting enough drivers then

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      • jblake47
        jblake47 commented
        Editing a comment
        Why punish the scouts because their parents are uncooperative? There's nothing in BSA policy that says parents have to "volunteer" for anything. Get over it and figure out alternatives. If an activity involves a 2 hour drive away, either rent a van/trailer or find some place closer. The boys want to climb Mt. Everest, if the parents don't drive, then they can't go! Yeah, right. Part of leadership development is problem solving. Sounds like the adults are not teaching this principle very well, if at all. We have a problem, so we're going to whine and pout until someone comes along and helps out.

        Sorry, not my cup of tea. Problems come with every activity, solve them that's what leadership is all about.

        Stosh

      • Scouter99
        Scouter99 commented
        Editing a comment
        The question is "We are having a hard time moving kids and gear to the various events [because of very low parent participation] . . . How do you folks handle this?" I'm, just throwing out ideas.
        Your idea is to pay people to drive the kids if parents won't do it--where do you think that money comes from? "A Scout is thrifty, he works to pay his own way" Your idea is just a different form of punishment, but instead of punishing the people who are the problem, it punishes the people who aren't necessarily the problem.
        The OP notes that those who are doing the lion's share of driving are getting burnt out--you can't pay away burn-out.
        If enough drivers cannot be found for any given trip, there is no "get over it" the trip can't happen. But if the pool of participants is smaller, less drivers are needed. The most equitable way is to reward those who've done their part. That is a solution, it's just not a solution you like.

      • jblake47
        jblake47 commented
        Editing a comment
        A scout is thrifty - so are they planning events that are too expensive for the boys to handle?

        1 driver drives the van of boys the other drives the U-Haul. Kinda pricy, but then the boys have to learn to budget and BE thrifty and not expect extravagant outings and still retain the Thrifty part of the process.

        Stosh

    • #18
      Boy Led: When the Troop plans an activity, theSPL tells the PLs at the planning meeting when, what and why. The PLs tell their Scouts to tell their parents that they (the Scouts) need cars & drivers for the activity. The PLs come back to the SPL and say, hey, our Patrol can't go because we have parents that can't drive (need gas money, gotta work, car broken, too small, etc.). SM and ASM helps SPL find help with other Patrols. I think this is what is called "Boy Led". If the boys want to climb Old Rag, get them involved in planning the 4 hour drive there, and back....

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      • #19
        I almost want to open a topic tangent. But it has been discussed before and there is no good answer.

        COST OF DRIVING SCOUTS

        I've driven scouts for years in minivans and large vehicles. I often drive six or seven scouts. I remember other parents who show up driving to the camp out and their cars are full such that there is a question if they can take one other scout. It usually does not bother me because it's my choice and I enjoy driving and just listening to my son(s) and their friends interact. You learn a lot as a fly on the wall. But sometimes it crosses from a choice to taken for granted that you will drive and when you don't big problems occur.


        Our troop has discussed it. What's fair for mileage reimbursement? Right now we don't do anything except in extreme situations such as 100+ mile drives one direction. Even then, we reimburse the driver a token amount. It is more a thank you than the actual cost. So what is fair? I drive five scouts and pay 50 miles each direction and another parent drives two scouts. So what's fair?

        - Credit the family ten cents per scout driven per mile? That's a lot of book keeping. But seems fair. Five scouts 100 miles round trip credits the driver $50 dollars. Each scout incurs a charge of $10.00 for that trip. It's realistic but it increases our camping cost a lot.

        - Require each person to drive to camp X number of times? What if they drive two scouts and another drives six scouts? Lots of sports programs require volunteer or pay.

        Just not sure what is fair for driving reimbursement.

        Comment


        • jblake47
          jblake47 commented
          Editing a comment
          Not all drivers wish to be reimbursed, but as far as the boys doing the planning, to assume a freebie ride is not being fiscally responsible. The price of gas needs to be taken into account and available in case some parent who is volunteering to drive doesn't have to personally calculate the cost before deciding to drive.

          A pickup pulling a trailer or with a heavy load is usually 15 mpg. A minivan will run 20 mpg. Calculate it based on current gas prices and mileage to the event. Anyone planning a trip of any sort personally needs to do this to calculate the expense, why would the boys, who are learning life lessons, not be doing this?

          Any driver who refuses the gas money is thanked for their donation, but drivers that can't afford to make the trip should graciously offered to cover the expense for them.

          After all, how is a trip to Philmont or Jambo (no rail or air service is going to get the boys there for free) be any different than an outing 25 miles away?

          Stosh

        • qwazse
          qwazse commented
          Editing a comment
          Or (for those who hate math): Every driver tops the tank before leaving. Tops it upon return and gets a reciept for that last fill-up (and any in-between if it's a long trip). Receipts are turned in to troop treasurer for reimbursement.

          If you have a sharp QM, you could have him direct drivers to do this while he and the boys stow the gear.

          We STRONGLY encourage whoever pulls the trailer to do this because the rate varies depending how full the thing's packed and the terrain we cover.

          If you don't accept reimbursement, you could consider it a donation at whatever the IRS says the going rate for fuel per mile is (I think it was 18 cents last year).

      • #20
        Avoid any policy that allows/requires scouts to drive other scouts. That's just asking for trouble (and could be illegal in some areas, depending on the number of youth in the vehicle).

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        • #21
          Originally posted by Fehler View Post
          Avoid any policy that allows/requires scouts to drive other scouts. That's just asking for trouble (and could be illegal in some areas, depending on the number of youth in the vehicle).
          The GtSS precludes youth driving for troop events/carrying passengers, anyway.
          http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/.../GSS/gss11.asp
          1. The driver must be currently licensed and at least 18 years of age. Youth member exception: when traveling to and from an area, regional, or national Boy Scout activity or any Venturing event under the leadership of an adult (at least 21 years of age) tour leader, a youth member at least 16 years of age may be a driver, subject to the following:
            1. Six months' driving experience as a licensed driver (time on a learner's permit or equivalent is not to be counted)
            2. No record of accidents or moving violations
            3. Parental permission granted to the leader, driver, and riders

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          • #22
            I had a Hardship Driver's license at 14. I drove a lot back then just saying... another example of how things have changed..of course I have always drove pick ups so I mainly carried equipment

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            • #23
              I'm one of the parents that goes on a lot of campouts and drives the boys. It's just the way things are. Some people are born volunteers, others are not. We've got a troop trailer and gas is part of the camping fees. We don't do mileage reimbursement, we simply pay for the gas used. The drivers fill up before the trip, and after the trip, and submit the gas receipt from after the trip.

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