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What are your best/most effective volunteer recruitment ideas?

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  • What are your best/most effective volunteer recruitment ideas?

    One of the readers of my website, CubScoutIdeas.com, asked how to recruit parents into leadership roles. Another reader asked how to recruit boys into her pack whose parents are willing to help out. What ideas do you have?

  • #2
    Tell them it's just an ~hour a week; it's worked on me over and over.
    Last edited by Scouter99; 07-21-2013, 12:36 AM.

    Comment


    • CubScoutIdeas
      CubScoutIdeas commented
      Editing a comment
      HA! I think I'll try that!

  • #3
    Promises of fame and fortune.

    Comment


    • CubScoutIdeas
      CubScoutIdeas commented
      Editing a comment
      So, that's why everyone looks down when I'm trying to get them to do something--they are stunned by my fame & fortune!

  • #4
    biggest benefits I got in being a leader and a coach... being a part of child's life and being final say on days/times so will better fit schedules.

    another way that I got parents involved just to help out was to have them fill out a sheet of what they can do... it really paid off when we got to webelos

    Comment


    • CubScoutIdeas
      CubScoutIdeas commented
      Editing a comment
      Great idea, IM_Kathy! Thanks!

  • #5
    Thought you would all get a chuckle out of this. I found it on the BSA website:

    "There's no guarantee that you will be selected for a leadership position right away. The selection process is fairly competitive, and you may be competing with a large number of candidates for a small number of positions. But packs and councils are always grateful for volunteers and should be able to find a place where you can help out until the exact position you're interested in comes open."

    Seriously?!?

    Comment


    • sasha
      sasha commented
      Editing a comment
      Some local units have a plethora of volunteers, some do not. I think few have just the right number of skilled leaders to volunteer!

    • ScoutNut
      ScoutNut commented
      Editing a comment
      One year, at Graduation, I introduced the new upcoming Wolf den leaders from my (now former) Tiger den. We had a pretty hefty sized den that year, and I had recruited 3 parents. After the introduction, I had a dad come up to me all upset because I had not mentioned his name also. I apologized, and told him the more, the merrier! For that den of 12 we ended up with 3 registered leaders, and 3-4 other parents who helped out on a regular basis.

      Another year I had 4 Tigers. Every single parent wanted to be involved with the den. For the Wolf year we had 3 registered as leaders with the others helping. That group was a recruiting machine! By Webelos they were up to 10 Scouts in their den!

    • packsaddle
      packsaddle commented
      Editing a comment
      ROTFL!!!!!

  • #6
    I've done most of the recruiting for adult volunteers for our units in the last 5 years or so. My method works as follows:

    1. Start small. Design some meetings early on that require adults to work with their own scouts. Show them that they are needed and that BSA isn't a babysitting service. If the adults are left to sit in the back of the room, they will eventually leave the room. Or, for a troop, ask the parents to stay and help with the trailer or storage unit or other small job with another leader.

    2. Give them a few simple jobs to do, one-time responsibilities. Praise them wildly.

    3. Offer a volunteer position in flattering tones. Make them feel needed for the unit to function. Tell them why you think they are a good fit for the job, and how much you will enjoy working with them. Matching the person to the position really is key.

    4. Promise cookies.

    The above method works over time, but when you need a warm body RIGHT NOW:

    1. Beg shamelessly. Ask everyone and ask often.

    2 Promise cookies. Take requests for favorite cookie flavor, and follow-up with a warm, fresh batch ASAP.

    Comment


    • King Ding Dong
      King Ding Dong commented
      Editing a comment
      Great advise.

      I have been promising popcorn and not cookies. How stupid of me, everyone likes cookies, popcorn not so much.

    • Nike
      Nike commented
      Editing a comment
      Brownies work, too.

    • sasha
      sasha commented
      Editing a comment
      Brownies do work, of course! They are considered bar cookies!

  • #7
    Sasha has it right. Review your prospective candidates and pinpoint who is the best fit. Go directly to them and let them know why you want them specifically (flattery gets you everywhere). Let them know that they will have a mentor and receive training and ensure it happens. Also, don't forget to think outside of the box when looking at your pool of potential volunteers. Extended family members, former boy scouts, young adults, church members, etc. They don't have to have a boy currently involved in Scouting in order to be considered.

    Comment


    • #8
      I'll be leading the Wolf Den this year. Parents always have a 100 reasons why they can't lead a Den. This year, we'll be starting a Denner program in my den and I plan to tell parents that the Denner is rotational and when their son is the Denner, they are expected to attend and assist at that meeting. Hopefully, that will mean no more than perhaps 2 meetings a year they are required to assist. I think that is a small commitment to ensure quality guidance to the kids.

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