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Can a parent with felony convictions attend troop meetings?

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  • Can a parent with felony convictions attend troop meetings?

    This is a very difficult question and I am having no luck finding an answer. I know that the BSA has policies in place with regards to Adult Leaders with criminal records, however I can not find anything about parents with records. We have a parent who has been inactive until recently, and now he is attending troop meetings, and committee meetings. Now other parents are expressing concern about him being there due to his criminal record. I am open to ANY advice, knowledge, comments about this situation! Thank-you in advance~
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    The poll is expired.

    Last edited by KayW; 11-04-2013, 02:00 PM.

  • #2
    Type of felony and how long ago are important. Obviously a violent felon would make people uncomfortable. A conversation with the CO about the situation would be in order and possibly your council. I would not have much of an issue at troop meetings as there are plenty of adults around, unless he is on the committee he really doesn't have a right to be there.

    Comment


    • #3
      KDD has it right. Without very specific knowledge how do we know????

      Your poll is to generic to be of any use. and I am guessing your the single no vote. I have issue with violent or sexual crimes but that isn't what you asked in your poll.


      The thing you need to remember Kay, is scouting is about the boys. Too many adults get wrapped up in various power trips and forget the lads.

      So you go and make a big deal about this, and the guy gets asked to never show up again who loses???? The felons son, who is not at fault......


      KDD your incorrect, parents have every right to attend committee meetings if they like, just as they can attend any campout, meeting or ceremony.

      Comment


      • King Ding Dong
        King Ding Dong commented
        Editing a comment
        Do they have any rights beyond observer ?

      • Basementdweller
        Basementdweller commented
        Editing a comment
        generally if they show up I hand them an application.

        Why shouldn't a parent be allowed to vote or at least voice an opinion on what the committee's current discussion is........ They have skin in the game.

    • #4
      Voting wouldn't work for me. That said, talk to your DE about it. My gut says, it depends on what the conviction was for. I do think, though, that parents are allowed to attend any scout activity.

      Comment


      • #5
        I can tell you they are drug convictions that included distributing to minors. However they are from over ten years ago. What concerns people is the possibility that he hasn't changed his ways, as he seems to spend a lot of time with other known offenders. I just wasn't sure if there was a specific policy regarding parents as there is for Adult Leaders. I have tried to put my personal feelings aside when investigating this. I have many years of law enforcement experience, and sadly that has soured my opinion on the rehabilitation of repeat felons.

        I am very grateful for your input, and I apologize for the poll, wasn't very clear on that.

        Comment


        • Basementdweller
          Basementdweller commented
          Editing a comment
          Before we go any further what is your position with the troop? If your a parent you need to stop immediately, your putting your nose where it doesn't belong.

          I am going to ask how you found out about his 10 year old convictions as well.



          So the drug conviction is 10 years ago.

          He might be in his late twenties or early thirties currently. so your going to penalize an adult for mistakes possibly made as a youth. The distribution to minors might be he was 18 and his buddy was 17 and he was ratted out.


          Again we don't know.

          Far as him associating with other know offenders, you need to explain exactly how you know that???????? Short of stalking him and seeing him smoking the reefer personally it is all hear say and you might be liable if your spreading rumors.
          Last edited by Basementdweller; 11-04-2013, 03:06 PM.

        • Basementdweller
          Basementdweller commented
          Editing a comment
          KDD I would not say a peep to the other parents. What is the point? Alienate them,

          This is a troop leadership issue and more specifically an issue for the COR,CC and SM to address in private. The SM and ASM's can keep an eye on things with two deep leadership it is a nonissue

        • King Ding Dong
          King Ding Dong commented
          Editing a comment
          Not other parents, the felon.

      • #6
        We have excellent leadership with little to no parental support. Now this particular parent is trying to rally the other parents blaming the dwindling numbers on our current leadership. Sadly without the leaders we have, there would be no leaders at all. We support and encourage all of our scouts the best we can and do our best to help them to have the best scouting experience possible. We do not have much support fro our council, but we do have an excellent CO. I think maybe trying to get the parents together and see what they want to do, because if our leadership steps down, there will be no leaders left, as none of our leaders have children in the troop. Thank you again for the input.

        Comment


        • Basementdweller
          Basementdweller commented
          Editing a comment
          So your felon parent wants to blame the failing troop on current leadership. The simple fix is to hand him an application and have him fill it out. He passes make him and ASM and get him trained. He fails well then his opinion is irrelevent.

          He may be right, How do you know your leadership is excellent? What are you comparing it to or with?

        • FrankScout
          FrankScout commented
          Editing a comment
          BD you thunder-stealer, you!

          I've had to put up with a parent/leader like that for 7 years now. One of his sons just made Eagle. There isn't enough bandwidth for the stories I could tell. He's a real test of my blood pressure. Not a felon, but I can relate to what you're saying. Give him an app. and see if he can help "fix" things. My bet is "no".

      • #7
        As Beavah would say, Yah, hmmmm. I have several concerns. Allowing a non-registered adult to have regular, direct contact with the youth is a concern. Knowing that the adult is a convicted felon involving minors raises the level of concern to the point of a Youth Protection concern. I think the troop committee needs to have a discussion with the Scout Executive and ask for guidance. I agree, that a non-registered adult attending committee meetings and having a "vote" is inappropriate. They are not a member of the unit...their son is. Those who are registered have a right to fulfill their duties without outside interference from those who are unable to become registered. I also agree that if KayW is not a registered leader, she is on thin ice. I think Beavah would also admonish us that spreading "hearsay" about a fellow parent without substantiated legal evidence (legally obtained) is dangerous.

        Comment


        • Basementdweller
          Basementdweller commented
          Editing a comment
          So PD, how many unregistered parents do you have at your meetings and outings???


          I know that I have handed apps to adults and let them know the BSA will do a background check, they and their scout disappear never to be seen again.

        • FrankScout
          FrankScout commented
          Editing a comment
          The background check will be the deal maker/breaker. Not only do our leaders get checked by the BSA and Council, but by the CO as well, with the resources it has available. Our CO has the final word regardless of BSA/Council's findings/recommendations. Leave nothing to chance, ABC: Always Be Certain.
          Last edited by FrankScout; 11-12-2013, 06:12 PM.

      • #8
        By all means, marginalize the person. Make absolutely certain that the parent and family never feel or become a part of society again. It doesn't matter if they've 'paid their debt', make 'em pay, and their kids pay, forever. Write them off.

        Comment


        • Basementdweller
          Basementdweller commented
          Editing a comment
          My pack, you have been reading my post too much.

        • eghiglie
          eghiglie commented
          Editing a comment
          I like your sarcasm packsaddle. Given that Kayw gave little info its hard to answer. They should go one further and have the chartering organization ban the family from the premises. Sad that these folks live with this childish behavior.

      • #9
        my hubby is a convicted felon,and he comes to CoH etc. although he is not a leader of any kind. The red flag to me was when the OP said he "seems to" spend time with other offenders.???

        Comment


        • gsdad
          gsdad commented
          Editing a comment
          This could mean he attends NA meetings for all we know. Distributing to minors over 10 years ago, for all we he could have been an 18yo slinging weed to his buddies. I am not defending him, and will readily admit I am jaded when it comes to drug users, dealers, etc... But the OP doesn't have enough information.

      • #10
        Guessing old Kay didn't like our responses......so she bailed.

        Comment


        • Basementdweller
          Basementdweller commented
          Editing a comment
          Their in High School, let them live a bit. bout half of my sons patrol went. Had a blast. This is not the first time we have done game release parties. Building bonds my friend, building bonds.

        • King Ding Dong
          King Ding Dong commented
          Editing a comment
          "I did, got home in be by 12:50." Yep, you got enough sleep. Hope your coding goes well today.

        • Basementdweller
          Basementdweller commented
          Editing a comment
          Not a code monkey. I work for a living.

      • #11
        A convicted felon will - most likely - not pass a background check, and will not be accepted by BSA as a registered leader. However - depending on the circumstances of the conviction, and if the Charter Organization goes to bat for them, a person with a felony conviction in their past - MIGHT - be accepted by BSA as a registered member. Not very probable, but it is possible.

        As for banning a felon parent from meetings - BSA says that you can NOT do that to a parent of a youth member.

        From the Guide To Safe Scouting - "All aspects of the Scouting program are open to observation by parents and leaders".

        A few things I am curious about -

        Did this parent offer up information on his past, and present, activities? How do you know what he was convicted of, when he was convicted, and who he hangs out with? Did you use your law enforcement contacts to look into this man? Have you had him followed? Did you spread the "story" of his past to other families?

        If this father is "rallying" parents to help the Troop, that you state has "little to no parental support", why are you so against it? Most Troops that need help would be THRILLED if one parent got the uninvolved parents off their backsides! Yet you are against ANY of the parents actually being involved in their son's Troop.

        Gotta say - the whole thing sounds very fishy to me. It sounds like you have a personal issue with the one parent (however stalking, and gossip, is not the way to handle it). It also sounds like you and the other leaders (without any sons in the Troop) are afraid of losing your own personal Scouting group.

        Comment


        • King Ding Dong
          King Ding Dong commented
          Editing a comment
          The circumstances would matter but many would consider selling drugs to minors an act of violence.

        • Basementdweller
          Basementdweller commented
          Editing a comment
          So KDD, you never made a mistake as a kid????

          Dealing drugs to a minor, The offense was at least 10 years old per the OP, The parent was probably just of legal age himself. So he was in essence dealing to his peers.......Which is a less heinous crime than you make it.

          But again we don't know the full story......at 18 he could have been dealing to Kindergarteners. We just don't know.

          The we get into what was he dealing? Meth or was it Mary Jane? Huge difference in many folks eyes and right or wrong it will be legal in most if not all states in my lifetime.

        • King Ding Dong
          King Ding Dong commented
          Editing a comment
          Well I did have a good fake ID and a 27 year old girlfriend senior year.

          Again, we don't know much. Was he selling to 13 year old or 17 ? And what ?10 years ago I was well into my 30s. You are speculating he is younger, I older. Who knows ?

      • #12
        BD, I've gotten the same response from other DEs.

        Comment


        • #13
          Basically my DE told me as long as the felony has nothing to do with kids or violence the person may still pass. So the 18 year old that stole a car who had a felony conviction became one of our den leaders as a 30 year old adult. The sticker was the dad with felony conviction for drugs that led to him having his children removed from his custody permanently due to neglect, well that one we didn't even put in the application, but he was upfront, honest, and admitted it all and completed the application so I could have it on file. The DE told me that because it had to do with kids, if he submitted the application, it was likely to be denied, and if it was denied, BSA may make a rule that he can't come to meetings at all, so it was up to us. After a few years (tiger thru bear) got to know the guy and he was ok--very immature, a bit stupid perhaps in some of his choices in life that he'd openly share with leaders--maybe no filter was his real problem Discussion within the unit we decided that he was allowed to come to meetings, but preferably not be a big part of the meetings but come and hang at the back of the room or help his son with projects. We tried to put a bit of distance between him and the kids for most of the meeting because ever once in a while he would say something totally inappropriate (like reference to his police arrest when doing the Bear fingerprinting that made others uncomfortable). In this instance it looks like a witch hunt. The guy is making waves the unit committee/leaders do not like. So they want a way to discredit him and send him packing. Then his background seems like a useful tool to get rid of him. BAD idea.

          Comment


          • #14
            It depends on your council. I was accused of being discriminatory when I refused to allow a man who spent 18 months in prison for embezzlement to be the Pack treasurer. Council said he paid his debt to society and he could not be denied.

            Comment


            • NeverAnEagle
              NeverAnEagle commented
              Editing a comment
              I still thought it was a bad move to allow someone with a known history of embezzlement to handle Pack funds . . . I don't know BSA Paid staff think . . .

            • Basementdweller
              Basementdweller commented
              Editing a comment
              Council doesn't have anything to say about who does what job as long as the clear the background check......Well unless you openly question or disagree with a DE or SE, that will get you removed regardless of what the CO wants.


              Not disagreeing with your NAE, I wouldn't want a thief managing any funds either.

            • Nike
              Nike commented
              Editing a comment
              Let Council hire him.

          • #15
            One our boys' fathers has been in and out of prison. (I believe he has ptsd.) We encourage him to participate, when he's not locked up. We follow a policy, where boys have 2 adults, 1 registered leader at all scout functions, including den meetings and outings. At pack meetings there are many adults around.

            Comment


            • King Ding Dong
              King Ding Dong commented
              Editing a comment
              bear requirement 7 Law enforcement is a big job. I suppose visiting the jail would count.
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