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Convicted, registered predator attends Troop fundraiser

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  • #16
    does any one even know the circumstances of his conviction?
    It could be a he said she said thing......and It could be 40 years old..
    .

    1998 - 4 counts of sexual battery on a child, sentenced to 9 years, the maximum sentence.
    http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/199...sexual-battery
    http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/199...sault-molested

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    • #17
      The guy has every right to pursue a normal life, but as a person looking to get beyond his past he ought to do himself and Scouting a favor by staying away. If it was a troop member/parent that called the local news, they're an idiot and thanks a lot for the attention.

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      • #18
        Why designate him a sexual predator if that designation had no consequences on potential victims? You can forgive but does that mean you give him a free pass around children? I'd keep an eagle eye on him and probably ask him to leave. If he was a former SM he knows exactly what his being there means. I'm sorry but there is still consequences to your actions even after you have done your time. Molesting a youth ain't stealing bread from the convenience store because you were starving.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RememberSchiff View Post
          does any one even know the circumstances of his conviction?
          It could be a he said she said thing......and It could be 40 years old..
          .

          1998 - 4 counts of sexual battery on a child, sentenced to 9 years, the maximum sentence.
          http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/199...sexual-battery
          http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/199...sault-molested
          Since it was an assault on one of his Scouts, the man should stay away from Scout functions.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Scouter99 View Post
            The guy has every right to pursue a normal life, but as a person looking to get beyond his past he ought to do himself and Scouting a favor by staying away. If it was a troop member/parent that called the local news, they're an idiot and thanks a lot for the attention.
            I'll play Devil's Advocate here. I think it was brilliant move to call the press. It shows exactly what we are trying to stop in our society; those who think they can prey on the weak and get away with it. Sure, go live your life after paying your debt. But I say again, a sexual predator showing up at a youth function is like an alcoholic meeting his friends at a bar. At best it is a bad idea. At worst, you tempt yourself.

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            • #21
              I have moved the topic to Issues and Politics where I think it belongs. Schiff, if you have an objection to the move feel free to PM me.

              Have a good evening ladies and gents.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by jblake47 View Post
                And he would have every right to have you arrested for harassment, or if you touch him or forcibly remove him, battery or at least assault.
                Even if a fundraising dinner is considered a public accommodation (since they presumably advertise the event to the general public), it's only unlawful discrimination to refuse someone for specific reasons (or, possibly, for reasons a judge might find arbitrary), and a criminal record isn't one of them. He can be refused service (refunding any money already paid) and tossed out since he has no business to conduct, and if he doesn't leave of his own accord, you can call the cops and have him removed.

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                • #23
                  That has to look good to the public to have the cops show up and toss people out at a troop fundraiser. How does that work out with the Scout Law? Courteous. .. Kind... I'm sure it'll play well in the press knowing the person tossed out is married to a council employee. Stosh

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                  • #24
                    It's always interesting to note how fast a person considered a low life can drag the holier-than-thou down to their level. Here's a rock, you go first. Stosh

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                    • #25
                      I don't consider throwing someone out of a fundraising dinner to being dragged down to the level of child sexual battery.

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                      • #26
                        Merlyn, What you consider is of no importance or value. I'm sure the courts do not consult with you on a regular basis.

                        How many troops out there do background checks on everyone that shows up to their fundraisers? I am convinced that they would be surprised who comes through their doors. There are dunks out there on the roads threatening children's lives every day. And yet they get a free pass. It's all a matter of what one knows and what they are oblivious to. Knowing does not automatically give anyone the right to hassle.

                        And for all those who ANTICIPATE what someone might do in the future, one cannot be arrested for what they think or we'd all be locked up. We are a society of people that incarcerate people for what they have done, not what we think they might do. This person paid their debt, the maximum sentence, so leave him alone. If he has learned his lesson, then one has spent a ridiculous amount of time wasted sitting around waiting for "the next time".

                        The courts have done what we have expected them to do, even to the maximum. There's nothing more to be done unless one wants to be judge, jury and executioner vigilante style for no legal reason.

                        One can forgive, but they don't have to forget.

                        Stosh

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by jblake47 View Post
                          That has to look good to the public to have the cops show up and toss people out at a troop fundraiser. How does that work out with the Scout Law? Courteous. .. Kind... I'm sure it'll play well in the press knowing the person tossed out is married to a council employee. Stosh
                          What happens to that slime ball of a former SM and HIS adherence to the Scout Law....Trustworty, Loyal, Courteous, Clean? He should have known better. We need to get away from this mindset that we've been in the last decade or so that the needs of the few outweigh the need of the many. He didn't belong ther, period. Is he allowed there, sure. But that's NOT the point. The point is he exercised poor judgement and brought needless attention to himself. If he really wanted to forget about his past he doesn't dishonor the scouting movement by showing up to one of their events. That's just too suspicious.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by mozartbrau View Post
                            What happens to that slime ball of a former SM and HIS adherence to the Scout Law....Trustworty, Loyal, Courteous, Clean? He should have known better. We need to get away from this mindset that we've been in the last decade or so that the needs of the few outweigh the need of the many. He didn't belong ther, period. Is he allowed there, sure. But that's NOT the point. The point is he exercised poor judgement and brought needless attention to himself. If he really wanted to forget about his past he doesn't dishonor the scouting movement by showing up to one of their events. That's just too suspicious.
                            But of course, he has proven himself unwilling to follow the Scout Law and Promise. Why all of a sudden would anyone think things have changed? He should have known better 10 years ago and he should know better now, but the Scout Law and Promise meant nothing to him back then as it remains the same today. He was accompanying his council employee wife to a scout event. He is not a scouter and no one else in the room that showed up for the fundraiser was expected to be following the Scout Law and Promise to be there. But somehow, someone got the idea that some sort of self-righteousness on their part meant they were able to single out someone and hassle them because they didn't follow the Scout Law and Promise. That's call bigotry, pure and simple, singling out someone who is different and taking them to task on it. I'm sure that if one were to dig deep enough into the backgrounds and lives of everyone at the fundraiser, they could have cited many infractions of the Scout Law and Promise (including the vigilante attitudes of some) and would need to throw everyone out.

                            If such intolerance is a message one wishes to pass on to the next generation of Scouting, that's their prerogative to do so. I'll take a pass on it. When the floods of crap come, I prefer to be on higher ground.

                            Stosh

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                            • #29
                              Stosh, bigotry is defined as the complete intolerance of any creed, belief, or opinion that differs from ones own. Maybe I'm just slow this morning, but reading this thread I don't think we are concerned with his beliefs or opinions. I am concerned with his actions.or in this case past actions and how they reflect on scouting.
                              One thing that is not clear to me was this a scouting function or a church function that scouts happened to be working at?
                              I think the man should steer clear of scouts having disqualified himself to the nth degree, but he should be able to attend a church dinner

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Oldscout448 View Post
                                Stosh, bigotry is defined as the complete intolerance of any creed, belief, or opinion that differs from ones own. Maybe I'm just slow this morning, but reading this thread I don't think we are concerned with his beliefs or opinions.I am concerned with his actions.or in this case past actions and how they reflect on scouting.
                                One thing that is not clear to me was this a scouting function or a church function that scouts happened to be working at?
                                I think the man should steer clear of scouts having disqualified himself to the nth degree, but he should be able to attend a church dinner
                                Underlined: Neither am I.

                                Underlined: And here's where I differ from the others. I don't care about HIS actions. There is nothing I can do about them. BUT what I can do is worry about MY actions! I do have complete control over them! How I react is important to the Scouting community and how I am perceived by my scouts as I lead by example!

                                What another person's opinion is concerning this situation is not important to anyone other than that person. Sure, there's a lot of people who THINK they have a solution to someone else's actions, but there's not a dang thing they can do about it except whine. It would be a perfect world FOR ME if everyone did everything the way I THINK it should be done. Well, the world doesn't work that way and the sooner we teach our scouts that the happier they will be in the long run.

                                I'm not of the opinion that this person showing up at a troop fundraiser reflects bad on Scouting, but how the scouts REACT to it does. Had I been in this situation, I would have personally served this gentleman his meal if I was truly concerned about any of my boys being near him, taken his check, thanked him, and watch him go out the door, just like anyone else that showed up to help the boys with their activity.

                                I for one don't want my boys thinking that I am all for protecting them from this "evil" person, but the Sunday School children of my local church don't matter. To me that's the message of the last line of the comment. I'm not ready to go that far, nor would I ever express that kind of comment to anyone.

                                Stosh

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