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Men in GSUSA, why the double standard?

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  • #16
    I think that the whole idea of the braclet got lost in the translation. THey were talking about how male leaders on a girl scout camp, they are required to wear a bracelet, making them "marked" as if to say, this is a male, yes we know he is here. I could understand if that male was a visitor. But then all visitors should wear them. I feel that if I am required to wear a braclet as an adult leader, then that is a form of discrimination. I went through YP training to be a Cub Scout leader, and I will probably have to go through similar training if I decide to be an adult leader to my daughters troop.

    I believe that there could be a double standard, but people need understand that not ALL men are evil. some of us are truly interested in helping.

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    • #17
      A girls relationship with her father is one of the most important things in their lives.

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      • #18
        Hey SctDad, I got your point.
        I think most of us did.
        You're saying that (only) men whether visitor, staff, or adult leader of a Troop are required to wear a bracelet.
        And you are correct, I would believe what you are describing to be discrimination. Especially since it is (hopefully) obvious whether the adult is a man or woman without the band.

        In our case for our camp, the inconvenience is shared by all adults. No band - shouldn't be there - Male/Female, Visitor/Staff/Troop Leader. And our bands don't demarcate by sex, but by functional area of responsibility.

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        • #19
          I am a Brownie troop leader in Oregon. We have many fathers that are just as involved if not more involved than mom's here. It has gotten to the point that all of my Brownie dad's now were a patch that says they are a proud DOGS! Meaning Dad Of Girl Scouts. My dads are great guys and I would not have them left out in the cold. They have every right to be involved as moms do.

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          • #20
            BSA and GSUSA are not about the rights that parents have to be involved they are about guiding girls and boys into becoming good citizens and leaders who do the right thing. They are not organizations designed so that parents can spend quality time with their own child. As far as Moms or Dads helping out with the troops that is great! The individual troops seem to be where the problems lie.

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            • #21
              Twomorrows, without parents there are no troops. The problem lies with a set of adult Scouts who have what are now discrimanatory, pre-conceived notions of the relationships between men and women and fathers and daughters. Unfortunately, in the name of "protecting the girls," policies and procedures have been adopted, to a greater or lesser extent in GS Councils, with the effect of making it harder for fathers to participate in their daughters' scouting experience.

              If BSA treated moms like some GSUSA councils treat dads, the lawsuit would be fast, furious, and settled.

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              • #22
                Nike,
                well said.

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                • #23
                  I have to agree to some extent. I believe family involvement is not nearly as emphasized in GS as it is BS. And men are the outsiders unfortunately.
                  I say that but my husband is SU manager and our Brownie co-leader is an only parent father. But I do get the impression.

                  CArol

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                  • #24
                    Yes,every so often a "sub group" is required by the "main group" to prove themselves.
                    When I became a single parent and took responsibility for my then 4 year old daughter, I found most of the folks I would look to for support (my mother, the preschool, the in-laws, my bosses at work)all had opinions about how I was not the appropriate one to raise a daughter. I was asked to accept a "home visit" from the staff of the preschool. Just routine, I was told. Not really, the other parents told me.
                    I constantly had to reassure my friends and relations that I was up to the task, and later, sometimes years later, many of them admitted to me their misgivings and congratulated me on my success.
                    If my child had been a son I feel there would have been no such misgivings.
                    The same problem is apparent in the Dad - GSUSA disconnect. Dads should deal with sons, Moms with daughters. Seems only natural. But it is not that simple. Possible sexual deviancy? Always a possibility, but we're talking fathers here, not strangers. There can be a certain amount of jealousy about the capability of the female leadership vs the possibilty of a male leader "taking over".
                    If the purpose is to help the GS to be a strong, skilled, self reliant human, than why limit her example and leadership to females only? Chauvinism? My, my.
                    Perhaps the dads just need to be persistant and be very available and better than perfect. They need to "prove" themselves even moreso than another mom would need to. Be aware of the unease and be ready to allay such fears.
                    I agree, it is more a local concern (personal leader?) than an "official" problem.

                    Oh yes. My daughter chose not to join the GSs. Back then she thought the ones she knew were "too dorky". We went hiking by ourselves and with friends. Later, camping and outdoor stuff might get her dirty, so she avoided other Scouting opportunities. Oh well. She is now 24 and happily married.

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