Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Early Advancement

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Early Advancement

    IT seems to me that advancement in cub scouts is less about responsibility and hard work, and more about what grade you are in. This confuses me greatly, and seems to contradict the stated goals of the program. Is it true that you do not need to complete the requirements of the program in order to advance? and that you advance if you advance a grade in school? Is, fundamantally, making a full orbit around the sun the only requirement for advancing?
    Is it possible to advance through the ranks faster? Can a child push through all the requirements and move onto the next rank in half the time, or does he need to then sit on his hands and wait for the sun to catch up with him?
    Very confused.
    If that is the case, then how can this happen?
    "So at the age of 12 years 3 months and 10 days Truman Cerney has become the youngest in US History." http://www.prlog.org/10853450-younge...-carolina.html


  • #2
    It should be about fun. Wheres the fire???? I didn't think so. There is the belt loop and pin program, lots of fun to be had there. how about the Gold and silver arrow points???? has he attended any of the council or district cub events???

    So is the boy that interested in advance or is Mom and/or Dad pushing him?


    Your article is dated, I believe there is a boy who has finished it younger than that. I will say rare is the lad who Eagles that early and It certainly won't happen in my Troop because we are too busy doing other things to focus completely on advancement.

    The important thing to remember that Advancement is only one aspect or method of scouting.

    http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/...out/pandm.aspx

    Comment


    • #3
      Cub Scout "ranks" are very different than Boy Scouts. Boy Scout ranks are sequential and earned. Cub Scouts are "IN THEIR RANK" because of their school grade and spend the year completing that rank's requirements and thus earning the patch that indicates they completed the rank's requirements. So while a Boy Scout can't be a life scout and work toward Eagle without earning all the previous badges in sequence, a Cub Scout can work only on his current grade's rank requirements. Plus the Cub Scout is already that rank and can claim to have been a Wolf, Bear or Webelos without having ever completed all the requirements for any rank.

      Comment


      • #4
        For cubs it is about Fun, Friendship, and bling. They are in school all day let them have fun and learn things they cannot do at school, "Character Education" is all well and good but will not retain participation. You need an active program or families will walk.

        Comment


        • #5
          Advancement has a different meaning in Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts.
          If you want to really see different, check out Venturing's awards and recognition system (the term "advancement" is only used by folks outside of the program), which most Venturers across the country completely ignore -- so much so, that BSA is attempting to completely re-vamp it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes, you do not need to do the work within whatever rank your going for in Cubscouts. You will follow your buddies in that rank/grade to the next. If you do not fulfill the requirements you do not earn that Rank. Hence, no patch on your shirt. You will move up. Just means that you will go through the program and crossover when your 11 and not before. Heck, you don't even need to earn Bobcat for that matter.

            Comment


            • #7
              Cub Scouts - Boy Scouts - Two different programs.

              Comment


              • #8
                So, officially, cubscouts is limited by the age and or grade of the student? If a student skips a grade, or is held back, he also skips or is held back in scouts?


                Comment


                • Basementdweller
                  Basementdweller commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I am wondering if we are speaking to a home schooler here.

                  We had a home schooler in our pack when I was CM. Bright boy, But he was EXTREMELY socially delayed. While mom claimed he was in 4th grade education wise he enjoyed playing with the Tigers more than his peers. He could sit down and do book work or a craft. But a game of tag or crab fights no interest.

                • Sqyire21
                  Sqyire21 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  JeffH: My son is 9 and is a Bear this year. I see the point you were trying to make, however not all school systems are the same. There are rules for ageing out of a Cub Scout year. So, while he could be a Webelos based on your comment, he's still very happy as a Bear.

                • perdidochas
                  perdidochas commented
                  Editing a comment
                  It's up to the parent/leader/scout to decide. We held my oldest son back in the 2nd grade (wolf). In his second year in 2nd grade, we advanced him to Bear. Then, basically, we decided that it would be better for him to be in Scout with his grade level peers than his age level peers, so we kept him in Bears a second year. Since then he's progressed normally. It's good because the boys in his grade cohort were nicer kids than the boys in his age cohort. He's now finished his Eagle Project at age 15, and is basically fairly close to the advancement level of his age cohort in the Troop. Slighly ahead of his grade cohort, but that's partly because he's more mature than they are. A good friend of mine also held his boy back in 2nd grade. He loved the age level cohort, and his son has stayed with them.

              • #9
                On the skipping and being held back I'd take that case by case. I wouldn't require a boy to repeat his wolf year if he was held back in school. I'd advance him along with the rest of his den. "The Bear Cub Scout program is for boys who have completed second grade (or are age 9). "

                Comment


                • #10
                  As others have said, the CUB LEVEL a boy is in is determined by his age, and/or, grade.

                  All Cub Scout activity (including rank AWARD requirements) is AGE appropriate. If a Cub is held back, or advanced, a grade in school, it is up to his parents, and den leaders, to come to a decision on what is best for the boy in Cub Scouts.

                  A lot depends on the Scout's maturity. BSA recommends keeping the Scout with his current, age consistent, den mates. However, the final decision is up to the parents.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by smilestill View Post

                    "So at the age of 12 years 3 months and 10 days Truman Cerney has become the youngest in US History."
                    Is he still Involved in Scouting or did Baseball take over in his life?.. Wonder what Happened to him afterwards.

                    Comment


                    • Basementdweller
                      Basementdweller commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Apparently not. He is listed as SPL here

                      http://troop874.org/pos.htm


                      It is in a troop in the general area of where he lives and his name is unique enough that I am fairly certain it is him.

                      look at this....

                      http://troop874.org/


                      Boy I don't like that home page.

                    • King Ding Dong
                      King Ding Dong commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Hopefully a scout made it. In that case it's a good start.

                  • #12
                    I wonder if anyone has done a Survey on the correlation of Age Achieved Eagle and Retention in Scouting...also Rank Achieved vs Retention?

                    Comment


                    • christineka
                      christineka commented
                      Editing a comment
                      My older brother earned eagle at 14 years old and was an active scouter until he went to college at 17. (He was always mr. high achiever of the family.) My younger brother earned his eagle at 17 and stayed in scouts till he went to college at 18. (He spent 5 years earning his BA.) Our father is a big scouter. I think both boys stayed because they had a lot of fun, going on adventures, and learning lots of stuff.

                  • #13
                    Are they Still active? I am Interested in How Many Scouters who get ASAP EAGLES...Stay involved in Scouting for Years and Years to Come after they Eagle vs. Those who Barely Make Eagle by 18. I know more Scouters who have put in Decades of Volunteer work after aging out as Eagles "barely" than I do Scouters who ASAP'd Eagle and Stuck Around to Volunteer.

                    Can a Case be Made that ASAP EAGLES are there for Themselves and Not Scouting as a Whole more than AGED OUT EAGLES?

                    Wonder if it has something to do with when someone Eagles..Could an Easily Earned Eagle lead to less Return Volunteers?

                    Comment


                    • christineka
                      christineka commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Neither of my brothers continued with scouts past college entrance. The one went on to bigger and better pursuits and the other went on to become a slacker.

                    • Baseballfan
                      Baseballfan commented
                      Editing a comment
                      our Troop only has one ASM who was a Troop Eagle... the one who had his BoR well after his 18th birthday. He had the BoR at camp because he was shooting sports director and didn't want to take time off. Unfortunately most of our Eagles "Eagle out" and are not seen again, at least not very often.

                  • #14
                    Sorry to hear the Dropped Scouting from Their Lives

                    Comment


                    • #15
                      Some of this seems to be more about the person, and less about their age when achieving Eagle. i.e. A boy earns Eagle at 14...and then goes on to play ball or chase girls. Should we blame him for wanting to experience something different or new? Yes, the troop invested in him...but thats the purpose of the program. We're not building a company, we're building MEN!

                      Perhaps... years later, either before or after college, he re-joins Scouting. Perhaps as a parent or perhaps before marriage. Possible he tries to rejoin Scouting, but finds his youth inhibits him. (he's not yet a father, so other leaders question his motives for being there)

                      I've seen several adult leaders who come back to scouting for their own reasons...some earned Eagle, many did not. I've also seen several friends who earned their Eagles, who left scouting to never return. This part of the conversation would make for a great research project however.

                      Comment


                      • christineka
                        christineka commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I do not know whether my younger brother in law earned eagle or not (I never heard about it, but I was in the picture for his entire teen years), but, being LDS he was volunteered into scouts and is now having a wonderful time with the boys. (Brother in law has no wife or kids- just a dog and a job.) My dad got involved when my oldest brother was a cub scout. My dad loved it, moved to boy scouts and has stayed. He has fun and has many friends in scouting. My father in law is LDS and was volunteered into scouting, but loved it and is very involved. He'd be involved even if he wasn't "volunteered".

                      • 5yearscouter
                        5yearscouter commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Christina,
                        we say they are VolunTold to show they were told they have to volunteer.
                    Working...
                    X