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Using ends of 2 x 4s (or 6) for craftsman

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  • Using ends of 2 x 4s (or 6) for craftsman

    The one-member cub committee has told me that I am not allowed to spend any money to buy materials for craftsman. (I'm really irked at this because I know there are ample funds, which will not go with us to 2014. If we don't spend them, they will disappear and we will be given a lower budget allowance in 2014. We have spent $0 on den meetings to this point, $80 on blue and gold, pinewood derby and camp were paid 100% by a fundraiser. Budget is $1000. Not sure how much awards cost, but I would be shocked if we were anywhere close to having spent our budget.)

    Anyway, I have no money, but I have a newly finished basement and kept the ends of the wood that was used to frame my house. The pieces are 8-18 inches long. I don't know what thickness they really are, but I'm sure they are whatever is standard size for framing. My little kids use them to build forts and houses on the porch, but I am willing to donate them to scouting. What can the boys make out of them?

  • #2
    One idea is rubber band shooter. Glue a clothespin on. Do you have den dues ? The dens don't get any pack money for projects in my pack either. We just come up with a cost per scout for a project and the parents pony up. We made squirrel release boxes for the dept of conservation. Cost for cedar boards and screws was about $15 per scout.

    Comment


    • christineka
      christineka commented
      Editing a comment
      committee member pointed out that the boys need not earn every badge, so she recommending just skipping it. Her husband had volunteered to help, but she says he's too busy. I have other helpers lined up, though.

    • christineka
      christineka commented
      Editing a comment
      Rubber band shooter sounds like a good boy thing. I cannot imagine that gluing the clothespin to the wood is going to work for long. Any ideas on how to attach it so that it will last a while? Screw it on?

    • King Ding Dong
      King Ding Dong commented
      Editing a comment
      Elmers Wood glue should hold it, not the school craft glue. Gorilla glue is good also, but a bit more expensive. If you have clamps to hold it on for 24 hours that will help also.

  • #3
    Builfing block sets. Giant Jenga game. Model ships. Shoe stands.

    Comment


    • christineka
      christineka commented
      Editing a comment
      I like that giant jenga set. I will see if I can get enough, long enough scraps rounded up.

    • mashmaster
      mashmaster commented
      Editing a comment
      We build a giant Jenga set recently, it takes 8 2x4's. fun project.

  • #4
    Let me think about it.
    we don't usually spend much on craftsman things. I'd ask the parents if they have any scrap wood you could use. I'd ask my pastor and the people at church if they have any scrap wood things. Definitely ask the people who may come in an make a project with the boys for their recommendations for the cheapest, scrap wood projects using whatever they have laying around.

    go to home depot, get paint stir sticks, usually free if you just get a few at a time. make the mini shelving unit someone linked to with rulers. have them cut, sand, glue, paint with whatever leftover glue or paint you can find.
    also you can use the paint stir sticks sanded down really well, use shoe polish for stain drill a hole in one end and put a shoe lace thru and string up beads or buttons or whatever that you can find to show what they did for the year. look for the pattern for the old cous stick from the old webelos leader book.
    the little blocks make one den worths giant jenga game (familyfun or whatever it's called now has directions), you can also google KUUB it's a swedish lawn bowling game. we made a den set out of scrap wood pieces including a scrap dowel someone had from a closet bar they replaced. have the guys sand them, paint them, etc.
    have them make their own career arrows, see if the cc would pay for those. check a local bow shop and see if they will help you out--a local bow shop sells us the arrows for $6 but you could have the boys do something to pay for the arrows plain with just the feathers, lash on a fake rock type arrowhead, and then work with them to pinstripe paint colors on it as they earn badges thru the year.
    have them cut the wood nicely, sand it, drill two holes, stick in 2 dowels (or pencils), paint it all up nicely. the you loop a rubber band over the two dowels and take a plastic spoon (or make a little spoon like thing out of wood pieces) and you put the spoon in the rubber bands and twist it round and round, put a small ball in the spoon and let go and it's a catapult. I'd count it for craftsman and/or engineer depending on how craft like it is.
    similarly cut and shape a base piece of wood, drill a hole in the center and put in a long dowel, sand, paint, etc and it's a neckerchief slide holder.
    have them try whittling a shape out of the softer of the wood you have to use as a neckerchief.
    there are tons and tons of ideas that don't cost much of anything.
    check with home depot/lowes, sometimes they do a birdhouse thing that doesn't cost anything and they provide the kits. sometimes joannes or michaels will do something cheap or free as well. also ask if they have any scraps that are too small to sell that could be used by cubs

    I would consider asking your primary president or other stake leader if there is any way around this.

    For metal working, get cans all the same size, freeze water in them, and using a big nail and a hammer, have the boys punch holes to make a pattern. use scrap candes (or tell them they ahve to provide their own candle), and a pipe cleaner or a piece of clothes hanger for a hanger for their lantern.
    You can make hardening clay and have them make a project--neckerchief slide or an arrowhead to go on their career arrow, or something to hang from their cous stick. more than just cut something out of clay and let it dry. I'd count it for artist if they do a good enough job,to show the overlap between art and craftsman projects.

    there are a bunch of pow wow books that have tons of ideas for craftsman type things that don't involve a lot of cost. consider a check online at baloos bugle and boy scout trail and other sites like that.

    Comment


    • christineka
      christineka commented
      Editing a comment
      Primary presidency has told us that they want nothing more to do with scouts, so not to bug them.

      I'm looking into stuff. The boys need to learn about tool safety, do the wooden projects, and make a frame. They've already completed projects out of other materials. I checked the leader how-to book. I guess we could make frames from craft sticks. Kinda overused, but we could do it.

  • #5
    Do you happen to have a Freecycle group in your area? I post there sometimes when I need something for scouts that most people would throw away (ie wood scraps).
    http://www.freecycle.org/

    Comment


    • christineka
      christineka commented
      Editing a comment
      I am the admin of the freecycle group. I've got leftover 2 x 4 pieces offered so far.

  • #6
    For frames, look at door casing and other trim. Even 1x2 furring strips. Use a plastic miter box and back saw (lowes had a saw and box kit for under $10). The 1x2 is like a dollar for an 8 foot piece.

    Comment


    • christineka
      christineka commented
      Editing a comment
      I looked into making frames from trim. It was really expensive- unless I did my calculations incorrectly.

    • Sakitama
      Sakitama commented
      Editing a comment
      Look at these. http://www.lowes.com/pd_4512-99899-7...ing&facetInfo=

      If link doesn't work, try searching Lowes.com for furring strips

    • Sakitama
      Sakitama commented
      Editing a comment
      Furring strip frames will be easier as no curves to line up perfectly as you have in molding.

  • #7
    Also, I love this web page and here is an easy and cheap project using a yard stick and clothes pins http://ana-white.com/2010/11/ruler-clip-art-rails.html

    Comment


    • #8
      I think someone mentioned recycling my son's unfinished wood projects. I think that may work- I believe we have enough wood from what was supposed to be a tool box for each boy to make a set of tangrams. I like tangrams because we could talk about the history and the boys could make the different shapes out of their set.

      Comment

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