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  • In search of a scientist and artist

    I live in a smaller area outside of the city. It's a 45 minute drive to the city and I really don't want to go out there. We have no art museums, aquarium, zoo, etc. We do have a government complex, where they blow up ammunition and test weapons, a hospital, a medical lab, and an ocean life scuba diving place. (I hear you can go and look into the water for free, but haven't been there.)

    As for artists- there are the art teachers in the schools. Not sure about anyone else. For my son, I asked my husband if he could find someone from his work- an hour away that could talk to my son. My husband works for a rubber stamp/scrapbooking/creative stuff company.

    Have you found scientists/artists from certain fields or businesses more willing to talk with cub scouts than others? These are requirements for the webelos artist and scientist badges.

  • #2
    We were very fortunate to have parents with diverse talents. I did the science stuff. That included bringing in a hundred page workbook with printouts and graphs of a recent analysis. I thought it would be "throw it on the table and move on." But the boys really dove into the details of interpreting the data.

    Another dad was in advertizing, and showed the boys how he did a lot of his work. Definitely how to craft stamps is right up that alley. (You'd have my wife hooked!) I actually carve stamps as a hobby. (Usually as a distraction at family events where the youngsters look bored to tears.)

    The scuba place would definitely have me hooked. It's hard to tell who would be best for your group. First, ask parents. Second call around explaining your situation. You never know who has a presentation for youngsters all ready to go.

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    • #3
      I might have missed it but I don't see that speaking to a scientist is a requirement. For artist all they need to do is talk to their art teacher at school.

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      • christineka
        christineka commented
        Editing a comment
        For scientist they have to earn the belt loop, which has the "talk to a scientist about their work" requirement.

    • #4
      We have a dad who is a teacher at a local community college. He and others have been willing. We're over an hour outside a major metro but the suburbs have some good museums and programs that work for us as well and are easier to access.

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      • #5
        A scientist does not need to be a guy with coke bottle glasses and a lab coat. There are computer scientists for example and kids are into computers. I chose a tour of the water treatment plant. The men running those plants are definitely doing science. They may not have a phd, but have taken many certification classes in scientific subjects. The plant will have a small lab with testing equipment and he can show how he tests the water at various stages of the treatment process. The sewage treatment plant is another option. Definitly biological science going on there. It was absolutely no problem scheduling a tour, they even had some booklets for the boys to take home. Park Rangers usually come from an environmental science background or sometimes law enforcement. For artist the scrap booking place definitely has artists. There are a lot more graphic artists nowadays than there are guys with a paintbrush and a beret. Do you have a local photography studio ? He is an artist and would love to get some more people in the door to see his work. Maybe he will make a den portrait for you. I called the science chair at the High School and he was a total a$$, said he couldn't do it because the state cut his budget. More often than not the governmental departments are very willing to help, they usually answer to an elected official who wants your vote. You will usually not have a problem getting your congressman to meet with the boys for citizenship. A formal request on pack letterhead 3 months in advance was all I need to get him to speak at out B&G. Didn't even have to use the professional relationship my wife had with him.

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        • King Ding Dong
          King Ding Dong commented
          Editing a comment
          When you do engineering I would look for a step up from your local "sanitation engineer" that stops by your house every Thursday.

        • christineka
          christineka commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks! We actually had a new sanitation or something or other system just open up this summer. They had an open house, but I heard they are more than happy to let anyone come look. I will see about going there. Our wolf leader is very artistic, but honestly, the boys get bored listening to her going on and on, rambling about her projects. (She brings them in every time I let her be in charge of scouts- whether we're doing something related to art or not.) I know we have scrapbooking ladies in the neighborhood, but it's a hobby not a job. Could we still have one of them come in and talk to the boys about scrapbooking and then present some jobs in the art field?

        • King Ding Dong
          King Ding Dong commented
          Editing a comment
          Why not ? The requirement doesn't state the person actually has to make their living as an artist or needs a degree from the Chicago Art Institute.
          Last edited by King Ding Dong; 08-28-2013, 06:52 PM.

      • #6
        High School science or physics teacher should count.
        Like KDD said any one that is in IT for computer science. Do you have a local business that does science based work? Farming area you can talk to a veterinarian or other farming science related issue such as weather.
        You are LDS and that church maintains a massive genealogical databases. national guard members my have a science background, local astronomy club?
        Science and engineering are everywhere you see you just need to look.

        Ask question a why is that like that?

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        • #7
          Today we went to a water treatment facility that uses microorganisms to treat the water to make it irrigation compliant water. It was fascinating! Next we've got wooden crafts to make and I still need to find an artist willing to talk to the boys. In asking around, I have possibly found a woodworker. Would someone, who does woodworking count as an artist?

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          • King Ding Dong
            King Ding Dong commented
            Editing a comment
            If he designs, yes. If he is just a grunt in a cabinet mill I would question it.

            Do you have a flea market around ? There are tons of artists making crafts at those things. They could talk to a bunch of artists.

            Glad you found the water treatment plant fascinating.

          • ScoutNut
            ScoutNut commented
            Editing a comment
            How about your local high school, or community college? Contact their art department, computer dept (graphic arts), or even fashion design dept.

            Are there any little tourist shops in your area that sell any kind of hand made stuff? Get contact info for their artisans.

            Hit local flea markets. You can usually find someone who makes their own stuff.

        • #8
          Would a pharmacist at Walgreen work? Could get a tour and a talk out of it?

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          • #9
            Or maybe set up a tour at the local hospital..... pharmacists and all sorts of lab techs, docs, etc.....

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            • #10
              As for Artist, remember that Art covers a wide range of subjects. In cub Scouts for our art belt loop we did cupcake decorating, mixing the primary colored frostings to see what colors you could make with them. A Cake Decorator is an Artist, they just make edible art. A chef is also an artist and can probably explain how artistry is part of the work of a good chef (presentation, color, texture etc).

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              • christineka
                christineka commented
                Editing a comment
                Great info! I hadn't thought of mixing frosting. That would be much less expensive than mixing acrylic paint. (We did acrylics last time and I had a heart attack every time a boy squeezed paint out of the tube. I bought the expensive paint for my family and let the cubs use it because I knew the cost would never be approved by the cub committee.) I know the grocery store bakery has tours for preschool kids. I will call and see if they'd allow cub scouts.

              • jc2008
                jc2008 commented
                Editing a comment
                Trust me, that was the quietest den meeting ever! The kids were so involved in mixing their frostings to see what colors they would get and frosting cupcakes. It was eerie how good and quiet and involved they were with it. We just had a few moms volunteer to bring a dozen cupcakes or so each unfrosted and another mom made a huge amount of frosting and added the blue, red, yellow food coloring to it.
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