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  • #16
    Quote: So do the scouts qaulify for the award after completing one of the 4?

    So if my boy does the Science everywhere he gets the patch, then completes the 1-2-3 portion and gets the pin??

    He seems like he's interested in it right now and want him to get started on it so he doesn't lose that fire.


    Right. The "first" one is the Patch and the other 3 are the pins. "First" being which ever one they pick to start on. My DS just finished the Super Nova award for Webelos! He had to do some research, then write reports on them and pick an experiment, do it with the Mentor, and then write a report about what he learned.

    My Council does have a STEM Adviser with the Council who will find a Mentor to work with you. He was like a MBC, which isn't a bad thing concerning he Crosses Over in 1 month. Gets them uses to working with someone who isn't Mom, Dad, or their Leader.

    Diana
    Cubmaster Pack 32
    Benton, AR

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    • #17
      Thanks...makes sense...

      Would you say that i could be the Counselor as a parent? I understand that if he went afte the supernova i would be out as a mentor.

      Thanks

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      • #18
        It depends...

        If you qualify as a Mentor, and you are working with more that just your child, you should be able to serve as a SN Mentor for them. (other Councils may vary)

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        • #19
          I really wanted to do a NOVA award this year with my wolf cubs, but I can't figure out how to manage it. I bought the book. I read it, but I just can't figure out how to turn it into a den meeting. Has anyone here managed this successfully? Do you have any advice?

          Here is my extra-brief summary of the requirements:

          SCIENCE EVERYWHERE: (1) watch or read about science for an hour, (2) complete a belt loop, (3) choose a question and investigate it using the scientific method, (4) visit a science place like a zoo, (5) discuss science with your counselor.

          TECH TALK: (1) look up the word technology, (2) discuss technology with your counselor, (3) watch or read about technology for an hour, (4) complete a belt loop, (5) discuss your belt loop with your counselor, (6) visit a technology place, like a factory, (7) discuss technology with your counselor again.

          SWING: (1) watch or read about machines for an hour, (2) complete a belt loop, (3) draw some levers and discuss with your counselor, (4) visit a place that uses levers, like a playground, (5) design something with a lever, (6) discuss levers with your counselor.

          1-2-3 GO: (1) watch or read about math for an hour, (2) complete the math or computer pin, (3) calculate your weight on the moon, the height of a tree or the volume of air in your bedroom, (4) explain the relationship between math and secret codes, (5) discuss math with your counselor.

          OK, just writing that all out helped me a lot. I think I can put something together, but I'm still interested in your input. Thanks!

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          • #20
            I don't believe a den leader qualifies as a councilor.....If so then the program loses all integrity.

            It is meant to be run by folks who actually work in a STEM field.

            So exactly how are you going to have a den of 8 boys discuss, with any relevance, their counselor science, technology.............

            I don't think that simple participation is worthy of a sign off..

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            • #21
              I had to look it up to be sure, but "parents and unit leaders may serve as NOVA counselors even if they have little or no background in STEM" (Page 52). Elsewhere in the manual it does mention the challenge of making sure every scout completes every requirement when you are working with six scouts at the same time.

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              • #22
                Hmm, must be different between the boy scout program and the cub program.

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                • #23
                  I was told the other day various den leaders would be heading it off at our day camp this summer. One is a teacher at the highschool (he's held many positions and was there when I attended so I'm sure he has knowledge in at least one of those areas), not sure about the rest. I brought up that I thought they had to have experience in the area they would be helping in/leading in but didn't get a response.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Basementdweller View Post
                    I don't believe a den leader qualifies as a councilor.....If so then the program loses all integrity. It is meant to be run by folks who actually work in a STEM field. So exactly how are you going to have a den of 8 boys discuss, with any relevance, their counselor science, technology............. I don't think that simple participation is worthy of a sign off..
                    I'm on my council's STEM committee, and I've been explaining this a lot recently. A den leader, cubmaster, asst. cubmaster, committee member, etc is absolutely able to be a STEM counselor for the Nova award. The only real requirement is that the counselor be able to read and understand the program material well enough to work with the cubs to complete the requirements. There is no requirement to even let the District or Council know who these counselors are. For the Supernova awards, everything changes. To qualify as a Supernova Mentor, you must work in a STEM field or have a very well defined and justified amateur interest and be approved as a Mentor at the Council level.

                    I believe the confusion follows largely from the terminology. A Supernova Mentor is functionally a very similar volunteer position to a Merit Badge Counselor, yet the very different STEM Nova Counselor position duplicates the familiar wording with a new definition. Looking over the Nova awards requirements, I believe it is very easy to see that there really is no need to seek out an engineer, scientist, college professor, etc. to appreciate the activity. The benefit from working with those individuals will really become evident at the higher levels of the Supernova award requirements.

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                    • #25
                      I'm going to run out of den meetings this year before I can implement any part of this program with my den. Next year I am going to be the Pack Committee Chairman, so I won't really have a den to work with, but I think I want to implement anyway. All of our dens meet twice a week. I think I will schedule some optional den-like meetings for all the interested boys to work on the requirements for these awards. I think the need for improved STEM education is significant and worth the trouble to give these boys an advantage.

                      I'll need an assistant. I don't know if there is any other adults in the pack who might feel as strongly about this as I do. I'll have to find out. We'll need a mentor. I'm sure our council doesn't have one in our area. Reviewing the requirements, I don't see anything there that I couldn't handle; although, I studied history in college, and taught Spanish as my first career. My second career was data analysis and that sounds very mathematically, doesn't it. I think I will try to get approved as a mentor.

                      Here's my super-brief list of the requirements for the SuperNova awards.

                      Cub Scout SuperNova Award: (1) earn the science and math belt loops, (2) earn three academic pins (from list), (3) learn something about Dr. Alvarez, (4) learn something about three other scientists, (5) ask Akela why math and science are important, (6) participate in a science project, (7) learn about a science career, (8) learn about the scientific method, (9) participate in a science related activity with your den or pack, (10) submit application

                      Webelos Scout SuperNova Award: (1) earn scholar, scientist and engineer badges, (2) earn three more badges from list, (3) learn something about Dr. Townes, (4) learn something about five other famous scientists, (5) ask Akela why math and science are important, (6) participate in a science project, (7) learn about a science career, (8) perform an experiment using the scientific method, (9) participate in a science-related activity with your den or pack, (10) submit application.

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                      • #26
                        Twice a week? I hope you meant twice a month, otherwise you have a much different program than ours. Unless you have the advantage of direct after-school collection.

                        And I can barely get my Webelos to stumble into earning one Academic Pin, no where near the three the Wolves/Bears need. I just can't see where this badge can fit in the current program, unless we want to offshoot "Science Scouts" as a separate branch (like Sea Scouts).

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                        • #27
                          Wow, I think the most frequent meets in our pack are twice a month (and even then its pulling teeth for some to attend half the time.) Wish you the luck with that and ty for the summaries!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by howarthe View Post
                            Here's my super-brief list of the requirements for the SuperNova awards.

                            Cub Scout SuperNova Award: (1) earn the science and math belt loops, (2) earn three academic pins (from list), (3) learn something about Dr. Alvarez, (4) learn something about three other scientists, (5) ask Akela why math and science are important, (6) participate in a science project, (7) learn about a science career, (8) learn about the scientific method, (9) participate in a science related activity with your den or pack, (10) submit application

                            Webelos Scout SuperNova Award: (1) earn scholar, scientist and engineer badges, (2) earn three more badges from list, (3) learn something about Dr. Townes, (4) learn something about five other famous scientists, (5) ask Akela why math and science are important, (6) participate in a science project, (7) learn about a science career, (8) perform an experiment using the scientific method, (9) participate in a science-related activity with your den or pack, (10) submit application.
                            I might have to steal this from you to use when I describe the Supernova awards around my council. I think that's the best short-form summary I've seen yet.

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                            • #29
                              New plan (for me). We are approaching the end of our program year. I'm going to encourage all of my parents to buy the STEM/Nova handbooks when they go to buy their new wolf or bear handbooks. Since parents can be councilors, and the requirements for the Nova Awards are pretty simple, I will focus on becoming a mentor, and anyone who wants to can sign up to be in my science patrol, and I will help them earn a SuperNova Award. It looks like it will take the better part of the program year to complete anyway.

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                              • #30
                                I think the most frustrating thing for my unit so far has been the lack of availability of the "Pi" devices (pins). Has *anyone* seen them at their local scout shops?

                                Oh, and it was sad to say "no" when 9 boys wanted the unit to provide the $45 Supernova Medal. Wasn't in the plan and it's a little obnoxious for cub scout uniform wear in my opinion.

                                Thanks

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                                • howarthe
                                  howarthe commented
                                  Editing a comment
                                  The medal costs $45! THAT'S OUTRAGEOUS! Medals don't have to cost that much. My son has quite a collection of handsome medals he has won at sporting events. I can't believe they cost $45. Thanks for the heads up.
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