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Tent vs Hammock

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  • #16
    "My emergency plan is to roll over, fall through the screen and bounce on my face... "
    lol

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    • #17
      I have been using a hammock at Scout Camp for over 10 years with no issue. My kids use one too. Generally we have about 4-6 using one for some if not all the nights. This year the boys scheduled a Hammock Campout for the Spring. We will be DIYing hammocks with the boys interested. Living on the East Coast, haven't had issues with not being able to hang. When I asked prior to camp this Summer, the Camp Directors response, "We have plenty of trees." I noticed several staff were in hammocks as well.

      As far as insulation goes. You can survive using a pad in the hammock. I did that for nine years. This past year I have made underquilts using military Poncho Liners and old down jackets. I do have a heavy duty down UQ for the winter. There are also synthetic alternatives to down which keep costs down.

      I have heard some Scouters say that hammock camping does not belong in Scouting because it violates the buddy system. That is nuts. Many of the older scouts already use one man tents. Also we have had scouts bunk there hammocks to share one tarp.

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      • artjrk
        artjrk commented
        Editing a comment
        Forgot to add. I also have two types of stands to allow me to hang in an open field (Camporees) one is only 2 1/2 pounds, light enough for simple backpacking.

    • #18
      Really???? Doesn't belong in scouting?????

      When they spend 4 weeks at summer camp, you want a decent nights sleep.....I have 4 weeks in my hammock this summer alone.

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      • #19
        I took the plunge over the weekend and bought a Grand Truck skeeter beater. I took a short nap in it Saturday afternoon. The maiden voyage is in a few weeks. I'm trying to decide on a dedicated fly or just a tarp.

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        • JoeBob
          JoeBob commented
          Editing a comment
          I've been using the same $4 tarp for 2 years now. It doesn't pack too well; larger than the whole rest of the hammock. I'm thinking of upgrading to a fly.
          But if you're not sure you want to commit to being a tree-hanger, go with the tarp first. You can always re-purpose it over your woodpile...

        • gsdad
          gsdad commented
          Editing a comment
          The tarp option is in the lead as I have no shortage of them around the house.

        • Brewmeister
          Brewmeister commented
          Editing a comment
          Welcome to the hanging club!

          You'll have to report how you like the way it hangs/lays. Since it does not have the structural ridge line of something like a Hennessey I think you will need to hang it loose to keep it stable (so it doesn't flip over). So, that might also give you more of the "banana" feel when you lay in it. Not sure because I haven't tried one but it's a nice price point if it works so let us know.

      • #20
        Hey guys, got a question for ya. I tried out a Hennessy Expedition that a guy in my troop has this past weekend, it had a seam running down the middle of the back and the sides hung below that seam making a very uncomfortable ridge. Did he have it setup wrong or is that how "the structural ridge line of something like a Hennessey" feels? Oh, and he didn't stake out the sides, if that helps.

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        • EagleScout441
          EagleScout441 commented
          Editing a comment
          I'll look for a different hammock if that's the case. You said that "You don't feel curved at all when you are laying in it right," well, I like that curve, it actually helps me sleep better, believe it or not. I don't think ENO hammocks have that, maybe I'll look into one of those.

        • Brewmeister
          Brewmeister commented
          Editing a comment
          If you want the traditional hammock curve then I would suggest something without a ridge line, like a military jungle hammock or even the aforementioned "skeeter beater." As long as you don't tighten the lines real taut you will hang below the center of gravity and be fine.

          The Hennessy is designed to lay fairly flat, and some hammocks such as bridge hammocks are designed to be completely flat.

        • EagleScout441
          EagleScout441 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks Brewmeister, Roy.

      • #21
        Just FYI, Hennessey is having their annual demo model sale right now. They have their stuff listed on eBay. Averages about $100 off per hammock, with most having some sort of minor repair.

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        • #22
          Been in a hammock almost exclusively for quite a few years now. Cold is an issue just as it is in a tent, but is easily overcome with some skill. I hammock in subzero F all the time. Lowest was in the negative twenties F. I use ccf pads in these extreme temps. Inflatable pads are not the best to use. While hennesy hammocks have a big marketing presence, there are many other options available. One last comment about protection from bears; a thin layer of nylon provides no additional protection from such an animal. I have had bears sniff around my tent in the past and also sniff around me in my hammock.The idea the tent will somehow protect someone from a bear is laughable IMO.

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          • Brewmeister
            Brewmeister commented
            Editing a comment
            What do you call a hammock camper? A bear burrito.

          • DuctTape
            DuctTape commented
            Editing a comment
            Have heard that one before. Still funny though.

        • #23
          Anyone figured out how to use a hammock and a CPAP ?

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          • Basementdweller
            Basementdweller commented
            Editing a comment
            Continuous Positive Airway Pressure it is for sleep apnea

            Yes I have....Buy a warbonnet blackbird, It has a shelf and when it is too cold for ambinent air you sleep with it inside your sleeping bag.....

            if you breath cold air thru your machine you will get pneumonia, Didn't learn the first time so I had to do it twice. for me when the air temp is in the low sixties it is too cold to leave it outside your sleeping bag.
            Last edited by Basementdweller; 10-04-2013, 04:20 PM.

          • King Ding Dong
            King Ding Dong commented
            Editing a comment
            Interesting. I have used one several times in the 20s with no health issues, maybe I got lucky. The problem I have had is condensation on the mask valve and lots of whistling.

            Can you explain the science behind the pneumonia ? Don't want that. I don't understand. The air temp is the same with or without the pressure. I personally have never found the humidifier useful and don't use it.

            Better start shedding some lbs. not much room in my mummy for the machine. The hoses and wires coming out of the bag, tossing and turning ? That's a major PITA. May have to turn to pharmacopeia. Zzzzzzzz. "As our campsite floats away..."

          • JoeBob
            JoeBob commented
            Editing a comment
            FWIW: I don't toss and turn at all in my hammock. And I also don't need to use the CPAP to not snore in the hammock. I think it's the elevated airway/head position. That doesn't mean that I don't still stop breathing, but I don't snore and sleep better in my hammock than I do my bed at home.

        • #24
          Hammock in cold weather: Update.
          25 degrees in a steady 15 MPH on Mount Yonah. I knew the hammock would be cold, but I couldn't justify investing in an underquilt for one trip per year in Georgia. Hiking up 1000 feet with water for 2 days made weight a big concern.
          Cold shoulders:
          Usually a single Thermarest under me in the hammock keeps the cold out, but my shoulders push against the sides of the hammock/sleeping bag and make a cold spot. This trip I took two scraps of minicell foam (actually scraps from the interlocking soft flooring you see at home stores) and positioned them next to my shoulders against the wall of the hammock. It took a little bit of wriggling around to keep the foam in place and zip up the mummy bag to my nose, but my shoulders were just fine! The added weight of the foam was negligible.
          Wind:
          I didn't want to listen to the rattling of my cheap nylon tarp in the constant wind, so I left it at home. Instead, I used an army surplus canvas shelter half. (Half of a pup-tent) It worked great! The ends of the shelter half were the same length as my hammock, so they attached to the same biners that I use to attach the hammock. On the foot end, I attached the two sides to each other under the hammock with a bungee cord. At the head end, I clipped a carabiner on each side, so that I could get in and out; but the weight of the biners was enough to hold the canvas down. The wind did not penetrate my cocoon. The second night I had to un-zip some because I was sweating. Caveat: the shelter half weighs about 3 times as much as a small tarp.

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          • #25
            too cold in a hammock?
            Just hang it over your camp fire!

            Comment


            • JoeBob
              JoeBob commented
              Editing a comment
              Do bears like their burritos cooked?

          • #26
            We are planning a winter trip with the Crew. I am going to try the foam pad method.

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            • #27
              Hennessey is having their winter sale where you can get a free "Cub" model with the purchase of a regular hammock.

              http://hennessyhammock.com

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